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  1. ryanjunobautista

    ryanjunobautista New Member

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    I have a 10- gallon panted tank with fishes. Currently i have Med ZOO Sun-Reef 50 and 50 and another one with LIFE-GLO 18". I am currently using the Med Zoo. Which should be better. I only got 1 bulb for each. Please help me out.....:nolook::hail:
     
  2. Mildly Rabid

    Mildly Rabid New Member

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    Reef bulbs have bluish (high Kelvin rating) light, which looks weird and doesn't help your plants grow as well as they should; If I remember correctly, blue light makes plants grow short and bushy, so that some leaves block out light for others.

    Blue light looks unnatural with dark substrate, anything purple but plants and fish, most reds, and an orange wall behind the tank. I only recently found a way to make the blue bulb that came with my fixture look good: an open layout in a green-walled room with light gravel and warm-toned stones to warm it up.

    HOWEVER, if your bulb isn't blueish, ignore all of that advice. It might be plain white or warm white, both of which are optimum lighting.
     
  3. Garuf

    Garuf Moderator Staff Member

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    Simply speaking any light will grow plants it really doesn't matter, it's what looks good to you, the plants will adapt their chlorophyll to suit, however, certain spectrums will make things look far more attractive and vibrant, generally speaking this is the 7000-8000k range. Far more important than light is co2, however, even low light tanks will be a lot healthier with some addition.
     
  4. ryanjunobautista

    ryanjunobautista New Member

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    speaking of Co2, is the Co2, emitted by the fishes in my tank not good enough? currently, i have one betta, 5 neons, 3 ADFs, one cherry, and one Oto cat. Will the Co2 enitted by them enough to feed to the plants?
     
  5. Garuf

    Garuf Moderator Staff Member

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    It depends on the light, your tank dimensions and the maintenance method you want to use. If as I suspect you're running 2 x 15w then you'll probably need supplementation of some kind, same goes for ferts. Read up on "low-tech" and you'l go far if minimal time expenditure is your goal.
     
  6. Mildly Rabid

    Mildly Rabid New Member

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    If you are a cheapskate and don't want to buy ferts like me (except for the occasional root stimulators), a low-tech solution is dried-out dirt or potting soil in with your gravel. ;)

    I'm going to do that myself to my 46 gallon in a few days. Pray for me--the tank is full and it will get very messy, very fast.
     
  7. Garuf

    Garuf Moderator Staff Member

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    Ferts are dirt cheap though? Over here at least, check out the ei dosing method! Also, root stimulators aren't really anything special, a good substrate is a much better bet. Literite base layer for example.
     
  8. ghostsword

    ghostsword Aspiring Aquascaper Staff Member

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    Ei dosing is really cheap, maybe even cheaper than soil. :)

    I would say that osmocote under the susbtrate, or rolled into a clayball and put next to roots of echinodorus or crypts is also a good bet, but nothing better than EI.

    Actually something similar to EI is used extensively in south Africa, thy call it tissue salts, this for people.


    .
     
  9. ShadowMac

    ShadowMac Moderator Staff Member

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    I agree dosing dry fertilizersis cheap. When you buy brand name liquid ferts you end up spending a bunch of money.

    I've become less and less of a fan of diy solutions like potting soil, diy co2, etc. it appears cheaper on the front end, but after all the fuss and hassle you end up nickel and dimed to death. I say save up and do it right. I tried many diy solution, a royal pain in the @$$.

    Check out Planted Aquarium Products | CO2 Regulator | Green Leaf Aquariums for dry ferts. It cost me around $3 for a bag of KNO3 that will last me nearly a year.
     
  10. ryanjunobautista

    ryanjunobautista New Member

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    so far, i dont have anough money yet to buy the Co2 diffuser. And i have a good substrate. Flourite. My plants seem to grow roots on their stems now. Just wondering if i trim my HC, and the trimmed parts, the ones which were cut of, can i replant those, or is it advisable to leave them on the surface for a while, and let them take root in there and then plant them later? by the way thanks for a ll the responses. i am learning a lot.
     
  11. ryanjunobautista

    ryanjunobautista New Member

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    another thing, if i have my lights open in the morning for 12 hours, is it okay to just dont use the air stones (since the fishes and plants will be exchanging Oxygen and C02) and then just use it at night when the plants need oxygen? Thanks so much for all the help so far.. And what is EI? sorry im a newbie with planted tanks.
     
  12. ShadowMac

    ShadowMac Moderator Staff Member

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    Check out Aquarium Plants - Barr Report - Subscribe to the Barr Report for info on Estimate Index fertilizing.

    12 hours may be a long light period, depending on amount of light and CO2 supplementation, running the airstone at night should be fine. You need some surface agitation for gas exchange
     
  13. ryanjunobautista

    ryanjunobautista New Member

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    okay, do i still need surface agitation hen the lights are on? Thanks so much.
     
  14. ShadowMac

    ShadowMac Moderator Staff Member

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    I would say it is a good idea to have some all the time. A subtle ripple is all you need, not necessarily an airstone
     
  15. ryanjunobautista

    ryanjunobautista New Member

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    Thanks so much..... Giving you updates on my aquarium...
     

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