1. Welcome to AquaScaping World!

    Become a register member to get FULL SITE ACCESS AND BENEFITS.

    Join the ASW community now!

    Dismiss Notice
  1. redcherryco2

    redcherryco2 New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2009
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    sydney, Australia
    I was at the local LFS fish shop the other day, and some guy came in and bought 1 stem of pogo helferi. He said that he was going to try and TISSUE CULTURE it?????

    He says that all his plants such as many different Rotalas and Pogos were growing rapidly due to tissue culturing. Could someone please explain.
     
  2. Shadow

    Shadow Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2008
    Likes Received:
    228
    Location:
    Singapore
    from wiki (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plant_tissue_culture): ;)

    Plant tissue culture is a practice used to propagate plants under sterile conditions, often to produce clones of a plant. Different techniques in plant tissue culture may offer certain advantages over traditional methods of propagation, including:

    - The production of exact copies of plants that produce particularly good flowers, fruits, or have other desirable traits.
    - To quickly produce mature plants.
    - The production of multiples of plants in the absence of seeds or necessary pollinators to produce seeds.
    - The regeneration of whole plants from plant cells that have been genetically modified.
    - The production of plants in sterile containers that allows them to be moved with greatly reduced chances of transmitting diseases, pests, and pathogens.
    - The production of plants from seeds that otherwise have very low chances of germinating and growing, i.e.: orchids and nepenthes.
    - To clean particular plant of viral and other infections and to quickly multiply these plants as 'cleaned stock' for horticulture and agriculture.

    Plant tissue culture relies on the fact that many plant cells have the ability to regenerate a whole plant (totipotency). Single cells, plant cells without cell walls (protoplasts), pieces of leaves, or (less commonly) roots can often be used to generate a new plant on culture media given the required nutrients and plant hormones.
     
  3. redcherryco2

    redcherryco2 New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2009
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    sydney, Australia
    WOW. Thanks for that. quick reply. ;)
     
  4. custom 240

    custom 240 New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2008
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    MARTVILLE NY
    I have started tissue culturing some crypts its been 3 weeks and no contamination. If someone wants to start a interesting new hobby I suggest you reaserch micropropigation. There are places that sell kitchen tissue culture kits they come with everything you need to get started. There isnt lots of info about it because its new for hobbiests but there is one guy on you tube that has some movies and he explains step by step from start to finish with a few different kinds of plants.

    One small peice of a plant can yeild hundreds of sterile disease free plants in a matter of weeks. I think anyone thats serious about aquarium plants will be interested in reading about miropropigation.
     

Share This Page

Sponsored link: