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What Country has the Best Aquascapers?

Discussion in 'General Aquascaping and Planted Tank Discussions' started by John N., Jul 8, 2011.

  1. ShadowMac

    ShadowMac Moderator Staff Member

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    I still think its accessibility in the US. How many of you UK guys can visit a local shop or a shop within a reasonable distance and find a good selection of plants and hardscape material? How many in Asia!?

    The market in the US is barely existent, so the scapers in the US do not have the opportunity to develop the way those in other regions do.

    And I'm with Liz, I want to see the "prototypical American scape".... how about typical scapes of other regions?

    Judging art is difficult as style and preference do not necessarily reflect skill.
     

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  2. Jason Baliban

    Jason Baliban New Member

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    I am hard pressed to think of more than 10 US scapers that approach planted aquariums with a layout in mind. It might even be less that that when you consider the idea of a "body of work."

    jB
     
  3. Supercoley1

    Supercoley1 Moderator Staff Member

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    Lol. I did open up with :

    My opinion and this may be taken the wrong way as I am generalising.

    And yes each region will have a 'typical' scape. Culture, tastes, experiences will always shape each regions styles. However I did say I was generalising.

    Each region will have a 'popular' style yet still have some unpopular styles.

    I was just casting my VERY generalised opinion on the question of why American scapes seem to rank lower. Those who break the mould of the 'typical' tend to do better however that also can mean that they are scaping in a style that is 'typical' of another region ;)

    Its nothing to be offended about. I am not pointing fingers or saying its a bad thing. I am just saying that what I see the typical style of US scapers is a little more 'traditional' or 'classic' than many other regions.

    There are also many people all over the world scaping this way but they also do not rank highly.

    That is not me saying that this style is bad or outdated. Just that it is not in favour with judging panels at the moment.

    Andy
     
  4. ShadowMac

    ShadowMac Moderator Staff Member

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    no worries supercoley1, i wasn't offended (as your observation may be correct) and i'm fairly sure Liz was teasing you ;)
     
  5. Supercoley1

    Supercoley1 Moderator Staff Member

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    Sorry was a long day and the snippets I spent on the forums all seemed to be someone having a dig at my writing. lol

    Wierd how you can go months with everyone thinking you're cool and worth listening too then on single days everything you write seems to get people ready to slap you in the face, he, he.

    I didn't think you or Liz were offended ;) Just didn't want to take a risk as I am only pointing out my opinion of what I see. And I don't want to put up examples of what I mean. That would most definately get me a load of a buse from individuals who think I am belittling their work when I am just saying that their work is not in a current fashion that judging panels are marking highly.

    I myself am a fan of no style at all. I am a hater of no styles. I may moan about twisty wood aquariums all looking the same or Iwagumi's being boring rocks placed in a flat HC lawn however that doesn't mean I hate the style. Just that I like a scape or I don't like it. The style is irrelevant to that. In many cases very irrelevant because people seem to label their scape as a style when in my eyes it is another style etc :)

    I would be a rubbish judge. the unfashionable one who doesn't look at the techinicality of something. Just how the colours work together, how the shapes work together and the all around aesthetic.

    Thats one thing dutch judging is quite good at. The surroundings not just the scape are judged too.

    Andy
     
  6. lljdma06

    lljdma06 New Member

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    Not offended. And I read the disclaimer. I post "IMO" & "IME" all the time and it's almost always ignored and a member will comment. A post is a post. It's still out there & it'll still garner commentary & debate. Still want to see that American scape. Why would you think you'd be abused? You were gonna put up one of my scapes up, huh!

    :)))
     
  7. Supercoley1

    Supercoley1 Moderator Staff Member

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    nope I wouldn't put your scapes in that 'atypical' US group. I don't know where I would put them. lol

    What I mean by what I notice of American scapes (and again I repeat not all of them) is the bridge from a dutch tank to a hardscaped tank.

    The sorts of tanks that do have some wood and/or rock but the format is a standard low foreground, mid ground and background.

    They always seem to be like viewing the edge of a woodland with a pasture in front in autumn as they have sooo many different plants in them so you get the effect of a line of trees in reds, yellow, oranges, greens etc from the mid to rear, then the obligitary medium height plants at the base of these and then the carpet or bare foreground.

    The hardscape is normally minimal and often un-noticeable.

    These scapes are great and good examples in the main of someone who knows how to grow plants and how to prune to get the effect.

    So I ma not saying they are not as good as other regions 'atypical' setup. Just that they are not in fashion and therefore they are disadvantaged before a judging panel even gets to see them.

    Andy
     
  8. lljdma06

    lljdma06 New Member

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    atypical or typical, now I'm kind of confused. I don't know how to take that! LOLOLOL

    Hahaha, actually, I think you need to take a look at my thread in aquascaping showcase and then reevaluate. I think I'm as American as apple pie... & proud of it!
     
  9. Supercoley1

    Supercoley1 Moderator Staff Member

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    Just read that back. I of course meant typical not atypical :eyeroll: my error there.

    At the end of the day I think I better stop there because it is impossible for anyone to convery a picture in their mind to someone else in words accurately.

    A bit like say Van Gogh's sunflowers. I can describe the structure as in bright yellow sunflowers in a 2 tone yellow/stone vase with a 2 tone background.

    I can then try and descibe how the colours work together but that would come across differently to others in how they perceive it. A photo can convey how the colours work together.

    Then it is impossible to convey how the strokes by prush or pallet knife, textures and energy work in the painting. You cannot perceive this in a photograph. You have to be up close and see the original to grasp this aspect of the painting.

    And then you get each person's differences. If 10 people are awestruck by this painting it may well be that they see different things within it that leave them awestruck. Whilst 2 people are stood 3 ft from the painting one may describe to another what the WOW factor is for him/her and the other may think. No thats not the WOW something else is etc.

    Perception is impossible for one person to convey to anothe rbecause it is a personal thing.

    I'll end my little foray into trying to convey what I mean with a rather crude attempt here. I am not really a great reader of journals as such so I do miss a lot of what people do. I guess that may mean all I have said in the previous posts is out of date already but it is my perception based on what I have seen.

    I guess what I mean r.e. the 'typical' US style of scaping albeit the US may have moved on and I have missed it through not reading scape journals etc that they are a bit like JamesCs tank on his website however they are not the current trend and therefore are not marked as highly as they deserve because of this:

    http://www.theplantedtank.co.uk/index.htm

    And so you should be proud Liz.Are you talking proud to do an style many Americans do or proud to be American? Both are good I am not putting down the style I perceive many Americans to veer towards just saying it isn't favourable in competition due to the current trend, however I see none of your scapes in that thread that match what I am talking about. Maybe the 8g has touches of it but my 'sterotype' if you like that I am talking about is the 4ft, 5ft long shallow tank with a line or 2 of tall bushy stems along the back, another line or 2 of midground along the centre with a bit of hardscape mingling in there and a carpet/bare foreground.

    I think many of your scapes are actually closer to nature style than the 'sterotype' I am trying to portray :)

    Andy

    Andy
     

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