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The First Stone 60L aquascape

Discussion in 'Aquascaping Journals' started by TheGreenFrat, Dec 2, 2015.

  1. TheGreenFrat

    TheGreenFrat New Member

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    Decided to make another video, right at the 31 days mark!
    Can't believe it's only been a month since this was set up. Thanks for all the help in setting this up and getting me through this stage of keeping an aquascape.



    -Bart
     
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  2. keithgh

    keithgh Moderator Staff Member

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    Bart

    It is looking very nice.

    You seen to have a strong water flow I hope its not too strong for the inhabitants.

    Keith:cat::cat:
     
  3. TheGreenFrat

    TheGreenFrat New Member

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    Hello Keith,

    thanks! The current is strong mostly in the front and right of the tanks. The rock provides lee from the current as well.

    I'm quite happy with how my aquascape is turning out, except for the right hand side of the tank.
    Things didn't turn out the way I wanted them to, over there. The rock at RHS, which should have taken a prominent place in the scape, has slowly been sinking into the soil and over all the RHS looks way too flat compared to the rest of the tak. This is supported by the tragic decaying of my Myriophyllum, which should have grown into a thick, high bush. This bush was supposed to steal the focal point of the tank away from the central rock (causing the scape to follow the rule of 3rd's, kinda).

    I myself came up with the following option for rescaping:

    [​IMG]
    This would involve a big piece of driftwood, which I can plant beforehand with Java Fern and some more flame moss. Some Valisneria would help add some vertical lines.

    What do you think? This is the best idea I could come up with so far. I'm open for any other restyling ideas, that would involve just the right hand side of the tank. Keep in mind that the tank already has some inhabitants which should I want to keep alive during restyling.

    Greetings,
    Bart
     
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  4. keithgh

    keithgh Moderator Staff Member

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    Bart
    That DW "could work" only point give it a slight lean to the right same as rocks.
    A few Cms higher might also help.

    Keith:cat::cat:
     
  5. TheGreenFrat

    TheGreenFrat New Member

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    Hello Keith,

    I bought some driftwood today at the "fish shelter" located near my house. It really is a one-of-a-kind shop I think, they will pick up and care for any abandoned aquarium fish. They also have lots of material at low prices.

    Before trying to fit it in though, I did some rearranging and while doing so, I figured I might aswell try this rock out that I had laying around. I like it, gives the tank some depth.

    DSCI0137.JPG

    DSCI0141.JPG

    What do you think Keith? It's a minor change but I think it works.

    Greetings,
    Bart
     
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  6. keithgh

    keithgh Moderator Staff Member

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    I like the planting on the big rock

    Rocks LH ?? they will be lost when the planting is established, my suggestion a bigger rock like the rock on the RH side height to be about half the height of the big rock.

    Rock RH slope it the same as the big rock.

    All three rocks to have about the same slope, this "should" give it a good eye flow.

    Keith:cat::cat:
     
  7. TheGreenFrat

    TheGreenFrat New Member

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    Hello Keith,

    I'm just going to leave it be...

    Lately I've not been feeling well. I recently quit college (though I'll get back to it next year) and I'm struggling with depression and lots and lots of time on my hands without anything to do. This results in me fiddling around with the tank way too much. While looking for floating plants today, I somehow managed to buy 4 different plant species that, after planting and attaching them, ruined the scape. Took them out, but the results were messed up substrate and messed up eleocharis.
    Another example of me being WAY too impatient.

    So far, all the random rescaping ideas that I had haven't really had any benefit.
    Kinda feeling bad about this.
     
  8. keithgh

    keithgh Moderator Staff Member

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    Brat

    All I can say is "Been there done that" I person know how you feel.

    Get well soon

    Also on 1.1.16 I had a big kitchen fire and went within seconds of burning the home down.

    My advice leave the tank alone and just keep up with the general maintenance that is a must even if you write it down what and when it was done.

    Keith:cat::cat:
     
  9. TheGreenFrat

    TheGreenFrat New Member

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    Hello there, it has been quite a while!

    By now my tank knows quite a few inhabitants; 7 epiplatys annulatus (which are sooooo beautiful) and 11 corydoras pygmaeus (which I sadly only see seldomly), a load of shrimps which have procreated very well. Sadly there are also some snails. Therefor I bought two asassin snails.

    But I know you guys care the most about the planting, so lets get on :p
    I think about a month ago my tank had its peak; the moss had grown into tall full bushes which were absolutely beautiful and all other plants were beautiful. Then, problems started to arise.

    First of all, I made a big mistake with the substrate, using 2 layers. By now the surface looks really messy.... Again, big mistake. Can't really replant either, since that will make it even worse.
    Furthermore, I mixed two different carpeting plants, namely the Eleocharis Parvula and the Sagittaria Subulata. Since the sag. grows much faster, it has totally taken over, and the parv. only looks messy. It is honestly way too much work to maintain the sag. because it grows about 10cm a week and spreads even faster.
    Third problem: the moss has detached from the main rock :( I'm so sad about this, since it looked so perfect.

    The following picture is a bit outdated, by now the sag. has formed a thick carpet throughout the entire tank, and I'm trimming it better so the leaves aren't as long as they are in the picture. The spongebob house is gone, as well. Oh, and the Myriophylum in behind the rock has completely been removed; I don't think it had enough light. I might replace it with a big tall bush of valisneria which should bring the focal point somewhat more off center.

    [​IMG]

    My fishies, they are beautiful! Their colours are much more vibrant in real life. I feel so lucky to have these beauties in my tank.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]


    All in all, I have learned a lot from this tank. Before this project, I couldn't imagine growing any plants in an aquarium with success. I think some day I'll redo this tank, so I can fix the problems like getting porous rocks to which moss will actually attach, change the soil and plant it with a single carpeting plant.

    Most of the things I learned, though, I learned from you!
    I'm really grateful to have a healthy tank with healthy fish and healthy plants.

    Kind regards,
    Bart
     
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  10. keithgh

    keithgh Moderator Staff Member

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    Bart

    It does not matter how many years you have had aquariums you are still learning, its only when you do not take any notice of what you have learnt and keep making the same mistakes.

    Keith:cat::cat:
     
  11. TheGreenFrat

    TheGreenFrat New Member

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    Hey guys, time for an update! It's been quite a while :)

    This is what the tank looks like right now:

    DSCI0063.JPG

    As you can see, nature has kinda had its way in the end; the Dwarf Sag. did so well, there was no point to it trying to give the hair grass any space.
    I'm still really happy with my dwarf sag. carpet. The moss has now fully detached from the rock, but the java fern is doing its best to make up for the loss.

    Maintenance done on the tank exists of feeding, and clearing out some of the floating vegetation once in a while. Measurements show that nitrate levels stay nearly the same, therefor I only do water changes every 3 weeks or so, and only about 10 to 15 liters. The fish seem happy enough, their coloration is fantastic.

    I'm planning a new tank for this summer. I find of want to go for a triangular aquarium, do you guys think it's possible to set up a nice scape in such a tank? Another option I'm seriously considering, is a cichlid tank. With my current tank, I find myself staring at the courting/spawning behavior of my Killi's a lot, and I think cichlids exhibit even more interesting group dynamics.

    Greetings,
    Bart
     
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  12. Orlandog7

    Orlandog7 Aspiring Aquascaper

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    What type of cichlids are you considering? I've had Malawi cichlids and enjoyed there spawning behavior and to some extent their territorial disputes. I've had limited success in keeping plants with Malawi cichlids as many are herbivores but there are a few examples online of successfully planted Malawi tanks. And finally you'll need at least a 55 US gallon tank. Though I managed to keep mine for 2 years in a 29 gallon. The key was keeping plenty of hiding spaces. I achieved that with more than a dozen vertical slates which did not look good.
     
  13. keithgh

    keithgh Moderator Staff Member

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    TheGreenFrat

    That sounds a very strange water change.

    If you are referring to a corner tank do a lot of research first they can be extremly dificult to do if you have not had plenty of experience.

    Keith:cat::cat:
     
  14. TheGreenFrat

    TheGreenFrat New Member

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    ^^ I'm thinking about Tanganyika cichlids, they are generally quite small and quite beautiful in my oppinion. 20 gallon would suffice for a group, according to my resources, although I'm aiming for about 50 gallons. I'll be picking up a book tomorrow on the subject.

    ^ Why is it such a strange water change? I know of people that never do any water changes, it seems like a pr

    That's why I asked; I can't find any well scaped corner tanks... It's quite beneficial for the space I have in my small room. I definitely would like to give it a try.

    Greetings,
    Bart :)
     
  15. keithgh

    keithgh Moderator Staff Member

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    TheGreenFrat

    I have heard of that being done in large planted tanks but not Aquarium tanks.
    3 weeks could be a large amount of evaporation.

    Think about the reasons why and you have the answer.

    Keith:cat::cat:
     

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