1. Welcome to AquaScaping World!

    Become a register member to get FULL SITE ACCESS AND BENEFITS.

    Join the ASW community now!

    Dismiss Notice

Sump filtration

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by David B. Diehl, Jan 6, 2017.

  1. David B. Diehl

    David B. Diehl Aspiring Aquascaper

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2016
    Likes Received:
    15
    Location:
    Indiana United States
    Here is some useful information. This 10gal sump filter pictured below uses an Aqueon AQ2300 set midpoint on flow. A 3/4" feed tube set 1.5" below waterline, 6lbs. biological medium, 4lbs. carbon. Flow is a little strong for a planted tank but would probably work for saltwater. Baffles are 1/4" acrylic, 8.5"x 9.75" using .65" eggcrate for separation. IMG_20170108_043254717[101].jpg
     

    Sponsored link:


  2. keithgh

    keithgh Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2011
    Likes Received:
    4,225
    Location:
    Melbourne Australia
    David

    Why are using the Carbon it is a good product to use after applying medications then it's removed?

    Keith:cat::cat:
     
  3. David B. Diehl

    David B. Diehl Aspiring Aquascaper

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2016
    Likes Received:
    15
    Location:
    Indiana United States
    Every filter I've ever seen had carbon, you mean to say it's not necessary? Was considering using peat moss, it actually benefits the water.
     
  4. keithgh

    keithgh Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2011
    Likes Received:
    4,225
    Location:
    Melbourne Australia
    David

    I can give you one good reason its in new filters people who do not know keep buying more = $$$$ for the maker and the LFS

    Peat moss has a number of effects on aquarium water chemistry. It filters out minerals and releases tannins, softening water and lowering the pH. Many popular aquarium fish hail from water, called blackwater or cola water, with very similar chemistry.


    CARBON AND FILTRATION

    Activated carbon is used quite commonly as part of the filtration system in aquaria, but there are many myths and,

    misunderstandings about its use and what it can or cannot do. Some of these myths are repeated so often that many believe them to be absolute truths!


    Carbon is considered chemical filtration. The effectiveness of activated carbon is based on a three-step process. The first is adsorption. Static forces will attract particles adsorbing them onto the surface of the carbon. Bacteria that settle on the carbon surface will further consume the waste. Another process is the diffusion of gases. Absorbed into the carbon the gases are detoxified (i.e. Ozone O3 into oxygen O2). The third process is called chemo sorption, where particles are irreversibly bound to the carbon.


    Activated carbon removes organic pollutants, some of which discolour the water with a yellowish tint, organic acids, proteins, hormones, antibiotic compounds, and organic compounds as well as a variety of chemicals, medications, metals, and minerals.

    Inorganic substances removed are, chlorine, chloramines, colours and odour causing substances such as phenols.

    Removed organic, particles and substances adsorbed by the carbon will remain biologically active. Trapped waste particles will still decay and remain part of the aquatic system.


    Activated carbon is therefore best used on a short term basis and replaced regularly.


    Carbon is used in the aquarium especially after treatment with medications.

    Filter Carbon absorbs toxins and colorants that might occur in the aquarium

    Filter Carbon, however should not be permanently used.

    Once the Carbon is saturated it can happen, that it leaches the absorbed substances back into the water

    Carbon will remove a range of substances from water, including:

    Dissolved organic molecules - this is the primary reason to use carbon in most aquaria.

    Medications, antibiotics and dyes - this can be useful for removing excess/residual medication, but also means that carbon should be

    Removed when using medications, to avoid removal of the medication during the treatment phase.

    Chlorine and chloramines (carbon blocks are often included in RO prefilters to avoid damage to the RO membrane by chlorine and chloramines).

    Certain heavy metals - the amounts will depend on factors such as the solubility of the metal at the pH of the specific aquarium.

    It is important to note that there are certain substances that carbon will absorb any significant amount of, which include:

    Ammonia, nitrite and nitrate.

    Phosphate

    Inorganic salts (like sodium chloride)


    The quantity of carbon needed for an aquarium is about 3 tablespoons of carbon for each 50 Gallons of water. Carbon is quickly used up and can be removed after just 24-48 hours. If left in the system longer, it will no longer serve its purpose.


    Activated carbon will not remove trace elements and is safe to use in reef systems. The uptake of substances like iron, manganese, molybdenum, cadmium, zinc, and carbon dioxide are extremely limited and is insignificant if used only occasionally.

    Carbon in planted aquariums should be limited, because many fertilizers contain minerals in chelated form. These chelates will be absorbed by the carbon as organics.

    Keith:cat::cat:
     
  5. David B. Diehl

    David B. Diehl Aspiring Aquascaper

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2016
    Likes Received:
    15
    Location:
    Indiana United States
    Good to know, I'll be replacing it with the peat moss.
     
  6. keithgh

    keithgh Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2011
    Likes Received:
    4,225
    Location:
    Melbourne Australia
    David

    A few years back I wanted to buy some UGF plates only to be told many LFS will not sell them as there is no sales after not like other filters where you have to buy filter media replacements all the time.

    Keith:cat::cat:
     
  7. David B. Diehl

    David B. Diehl Aspiring Aquascaper

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2016
    Likes Received:
    15
    Location:
    Indiana United States
    Had the same problem on the internet. Had to buy bigger set and cut them down to size.
    Think I figured the pump situation out, what about a ball valve on the out flow? It's a magnetic pump so it shouldn't over heat.
     
  8. keithgh

    keithgh Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2011
    Likes Received:
    4,225
    Location:
    Melbourne Australia
    David

    Sorry I do not know that answer for you.

    Keith:cat::cat:
     
  9. Wendy1B

    Wendy1B Aspiring Aquascaper

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2017
    Likes Received:
    125
    Location:
    WA
    I have had Purigen recommended to me in a planted tank to replace carbon as chemical filtration; have you tried it?
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2017
  10. keithgh

    keithgh Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2011
    Likes Received:
    4,225
    Location:
    Melbourne Australia
    Wendy this is the Aust price. It would want to be a fantastic product to cost that much.
    Boyd Chemi Pure ELITE 1332g Filter Media Removes Phosphate Silicate Aquarium Ion

    AU $129.95

    Carbon is an excellent product to use after using Medications it is not required as a 24/7 product.

    Keith:cat::cat:
     
  11. Wendy1B

    Wendy1B Aspiring Aquascaper

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2017
    Likes Received:
    125
    Location:
    WA
    I apologize, I meant Purigen, not Chemipure. I edited my post. Some Shrimp keepers I know have highly recommended Purigen, as it keeps the Water crystal clear, assists in keeping nitrogenous waste in check, and changes color when spent. At that time recharging is a simple matter and a bag can be recharged many times.
     
  12. keithgh

    keithgh Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2011
    Likes Received:
    4,225
    Location:
    Melbourne Australia
    Wendy that sounds a lot better I used Purigen in my Eheim canister filter its a very good product.

    Keith:cat::cat:
     

Share This Page

Sponsored link: