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Stocking a Nano Aquarium

Discussion in 'AquaScaping World Magazine Discussions' started by John N., Apr 10, 2008.

  1. John N.

    John N. Administrator Staff Member

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    Please discuss and comment on Liz Marchio's Stocking a Nano Aquarium here.

    [​IMG]

    -John N.
     
  2. Liz_M

    Liz_M New Member

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    Hi everyone! If you have any questions or comments (constructive or otherwise!) please feel free to post! :)

    Thanks for reading ASW!

    -Liz
     
  3. waterfaller1

    waterfaller1 New Member

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    I will definitely read it and post my comments. Thanks so much. I am nano all the way..8)
     
  4. Guillermo

    Guillermo New Member

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    I will read it for sure, I have 3 nanos and a fourth coming soon, thanks for sharing Liz and John.

    Regards
     
  5. KristinM85

    KristinM85 New Member

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    Great article, I was bracing myself to see stocking suggestions for tanks under 10g and prepared to argue my views. :D I think it is very well written!

    I'm a firm believer that nano planted tanks (or tanks 10g and under in general) are not for beginners (I started with a 10g and of course, stocked it improperly). People try to put way too many fish or fish that get way too large in those tanks thinking they'll just "grow to the size of their tank". I hate to let beginners down by telling them they need to take all their fish back or upgrade the tank, but it has to be done.

    Your advice is excellent in what all people should consider when stocking a nano tank. :D

    edit: Finally found the larger version so I could see the boxes on the article. I like your suggestions for fish that are good for nanos. Some of them are better for 20g and above (Swordtails and Apistos for example), but 20g can be considered a nano. I personally don't like keeping Cories in anything less than 10g. Even the Dwarf species need swimming room that a 5g simply cannot provide. The exception to that would be a breeding group. They would be ok in 5-10g, but would be specifically for breeding and probably not kept in that tank long term. Most of the shell dwelling species need more than 10g. Multies are an exception. These are fine for a 10g. Some people keep those in a 5g, but they are pretty prolific breeders (not as bad as guppies though) so they would quickly outgrow a 5g....and even a 10g in some amount of time. They also aren't nano planted tank friendly since they dig. Schooling fish generally need atleast 10g.....for the tiny ones, like Microrasboras, 8g+ would be best. These fish still deserve a school and I don't believe that 8+ Microrasboras would be happy in a 5g. Just my opinion though and ALOT of people don't agree with me. :rolleyes:
     
  6. Liz_M

    Liz_M New Member

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    I agree with most of your suggestions! It can be a matter of writing a short, concise document and I leave some things slightly ambiguous to maintain interest in reading! I know I don't like reading long, meticulous "rants", so some of it I left up to the hobbyist.

    For the sake of discussion, Kristin, what would you make of a 10g modified to be 1/2 the height and twice the surface area for keeping cories? How about a 10g fitted with extra current (a small powerhead/pump/output of filter) that would allow the catfish to swim "upstream"?
    Just some what-ifs I consider when thinking about limitations. What do you guys think?
     
  7. KristinM85

    KristinM85 New Member

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    I definitely understand the reasoning for leaving it a little ambiguous. :)

    Now increasing the surface area, while still having the same number of gallons would definitely work for smaller Cories. I was just thinking of the standard 10g, which most people would have available. There are definitely exceptions to my stocking suggestions, if the surface area were to change on that size tank.

    I'd like to see some input from others. :)
     
  8. waterfaller1

    waterfaller1 New Member

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    I have several nanos and do not keep more than one fish in the smallest. Some fish like Kristin said, although small, do need room to swim. I got a few Kubotai rasboras for my 10 gal, and they were not good nano fish at all. They darted back and forth constantly, disrupting the other mellow fish. I love my little corydoras, I keep pygmy & Habrosus. I do feel my current stocking has outgrown my 10 gallon though, even though they are small. I am setting up a 20 long, and I think they will be much more comfortable.

    Very nicely written article. I agree with you on keeping a heater in all tanks regardless of where you live. I also recommend that a thermometer is also kept, as most heaters are innacurate.
     
  9. Liz_M

    Liz_M New Member

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    Yup, exactly the the reason for ambiguity! That's why I suggested fish for volume and not tank shape, or at least tried to! 8)

    Personally, I have an unused 20 gallon tank that was custom made. 4" tall! We want to do native fish (darters) eventually. Of course, this would be a horrible tank for most normally suggested fish.

    Thank you for the comments, waterfaller1! I'm glad to have hit on some of those easily forgotten things about tank set-ups! :D
     
  10. Garhan

    Garhan New Member

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    Has anyone ever stocked Killifish in a nano tank. When I was breeding this group of fish of which most are annuals (live 1-3 years depending on the spieces) they were usually kept in 2-10 gallon tanks. They are some of the most colourful fresh water fish around.
    They also prefer more acidic water , but can be kept in harder water as well. Breeding is relatively easy, buy supplying a small container with peat in it in the tank for them to spawn in. Some will spawn as well in the plant leaves and can be water born or you can supply a spawning mop by floating it in the tank and weekly harvest the eggs from the mop or peat, or not your choice.. The peat spawners eggs need to be incubated from several weeks to months prior to hacthing. (again speices dependent) Usually the best place to get Killies from are by trading or purchasing eggs through Killie sites or ebay. They come to you in a sample of dirt or peat moss bundled in a container or plastic bag. Most LFS do not carry them on a regular bases.

    http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b112/Garhan/BlueGularis0002.jpg
     
  11. milalic

    milalic New Member

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    I would say that rasboras, boraras, smaller tetras like embers/neons, some scarlet badis will make excellent fish for a nano tank. You can have around 5-7 of them in a 10G and some shrimp and snails in there.

    regards,
    Pedro
     
  12. Supercoley1

    Supercoley1 Moderator Staff Member

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    This is a well written article, I guess aimed at the newbie fishkeeper, but is somewhat misplaced being in a planted forum IMO.

    For example:
    On my 10 ltr (yes 10 ltr not gallon) I have cherry shrimp in it. I use no heater at all. A heater only goes in if I put Cory Fry in there to 'grow out' and the shrimp don't seem to mind the raise in temp. Probs 20-21 ambient up to 28 with the heater in.

    The HOB filter being the most popular/common filter is obviously a US thing. Here in the UK not many people use this type of filter. I use a 200lph (20x turnover) external on mine. Others use internal filters.

    On the inch per gallon rule well.......never taken any notice of this. Many planted tanks will have 2+ inch per gallon. The plants and the heavy filtration we use take up the slack here.

    I have to disagree with this one. strike a balance and you can forget about water changes. They aren't necessary at all in this scenario. I myself only just did my first water change in over a year on my main tank. My 10ltr Nano has not had a water change for 5 months!!!
    These tanks do have filtration but this is mainly because I want all the particles out of the water. They are after all aquascapes and therefore I want 'uber' water clarity.

    I'm not sure how much a part the bacteria play in a non CO2 tank where no or minimal ferts are added. The plants are going to grab as much of the N source as they can and therefore it will be at a minimum for the filter to take in.

    I guess this is all part of the debate on whether a planted tank should be fishless cycled. That is if a planted tank actually cycles at all!!!

    AC
     
  13. tenshu

    tenshu New Member

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    My opinion is that i hate people who register to a forum only to spam members with poorly hidden links to their online shop.

    You know what i mean.
     

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