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Ryuboku explained

Discussion in 'General Aquascaping and Planted Tank Discussions' started by Anti-Pjerrot, Apr 17, 2008.

  1. Anti-Pjerrot

    Anti-Pjerrot New Member

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    This term Ryuboku has popped up some times discussing some of the great scapers. I saw it with the name Fumio Shiga in a reply from Norbert Sabat, but can't seem to find any material on what it means in aquascaping.

    Its Japanese (Ryuuboku) for Driftwood/timber/floating wood

    I know Norbert Sabat and Luis Navarro has used the term, and it has something to do about the driftwood arrangement in terms of aquascaping(Correct me if im wrong)

    Please - share your knowledge in details about this term so we can learn some skills.

    [​IMG]
     
  2. John N.

    John N. Administrator Staff Member

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    It seems to be a new term that keeps is appearing on the planted tank scene. It could just refer to driftwood arrangement period. No rhyme or meaning to it. Maybe even just a marketing ploy by ADA?

    If there is a meaning to as it applies to aquascaping I would love to know too.

    -John N.
     
  3. Norbert Sabat

    Norbert Sabat New Member

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    I used this term to say what kind of layout i made. From long time i don't use "Nature Aquarium" style because this term is too fully to me ;). Right now i (and lot of people in Poland) use:

    iwagumi - primary rocks layout (layout without driftwood)
    ryuboku - primary driftwood layout (layout mixed also with stones)
    mizube - primary driftwood layout with wood and plants above surface
    ....i sometimes use term Nature when layout don't have heavy hardscape but have some parts from ryuboku,iwagumi.....in Poland we call this also "japanese style" ;)

    and that about nature aquarium style ;).

    If we talking about different styles i use term:

    planted - tank with lots of plants where plants are more important than fish
    dutch - Dutch planted tank style - right now not so popular
    LT - low tech planted like Diana Walstad method without CO2, ferts etc....you call this El Natural i think ;)
    biotop - biotop tanks like SA, BlackWater, Tanganica etc...

    IMHO there's no american, polish, french or german style ....all of this i define with same rules
     
  4. Anti-Pjerrot

    Anti-Pjerrot New Member

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    Does Ryuboku layouts have a tendency to resemble "driftwood" in terms of looking like washed up driftwood that are overgrown with mosses/ferns.

    I mean instead of resemble live roots/trees.
     
  5. John N.

    John N. Administrator Staff Member

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    Norbert thanks for posting this very interesting information.

    From the sounds of it, "Ryuboku" is a coined word to describe Nature/Japanese aquascaping layouts using driftwood as their primary points of interest. I think this definition would include driftwood that resembles roots and trees.

    Are there other rules applying to driftwood that makes a certain scape a "Ryuboku" scape?

    -John N.
     
  6. Pat7676

    Pat7676 New Member

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    Wow what kind of DW is in that tank i love it?
     
  7. John N.

    John N. Administrator Staff Member

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    Since ASW's November 2009 Aquascape of the Month by Maciek Michalski is described as a Ryuboku aquascape, I think I'll give this thread a bump. Maybe folks have additional thoughts to share that can help others find answers to these questions:

    1) What is a
    Ryuboku aquascape?
    2) How to create one a true
    Ryuboku aquascape?
    3) What can other Ryuboku aquascapes look like? Do you have any photo examples?

    -John N.


     

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