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Ohly's first scape

Discussion in 'Aquascaping Journals' started by Ohly, Aug 25, 2013.

  1. ShadowMac

    ShadowMac Moderator Staff Member

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    Your fertilizing routine is probably short on nitrate, possibly phosphate if you don't have a heavy bio load. I would look at getting a nitrate fert alongside some phosshate. I don't think that is the cause of the algae however.

    Splitting the photoperiod is a method to combat a situation in which you have too much light. I would consider removing one of those light fixtures.

    It important to remember good things happen slowly, bad things quickly. You will need to keep at combating the algae for a couple weeks, remove it when you see it, spot treat with liquid carbon at water changes, and make the adjustments so it doesn't continue to grow.

    Read this: James' Algae Guide
     
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  2. keithgh

    keithgh Moderator Staff Member

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    Ohly

    I suggest this might help you.

    Contact Seachem explain your concerns, what and how you are using their products and ask them what water tests should be done so they can assist you in getting the balance correct.

    I did a similar thing many years ago and they were extremely helpful.

    Keith:):)
     
  3. ShadowMac

    ShadowMac Moderator Staff Member

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    If you are referring to using Excel to combat algae, Seachem won't have much to say on the topic. There are legal reasons they do not want the product classified as an algaecide. So they tend to be ambiguous on its algae fighting ability (brown brush and staghorn, won't kill green) Double dosing it is fine and won't build up, it has about a 12-24 hour lifespan and degrades in the presence of light.
     
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  4. keithgh

    keithgh Moderator Staff Member

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    Shawn & Ohly
    I was referring to using the correct amount of their plant fertilisers for your water conditions.

    All I can say is they were extremely helpful in advising what tests to get done then after they received the results they advised me what and quantities to use.

    Several months later I ran the same tests and a few adjustments were made all I can say is my tank speaks for its self.

    Keith:):)
     
  5. Ohly

    Ohly Aspiring Aquascaper

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    Hi everyone,

    Quick update, since i do a 10 to 20% water change every week most of really annoying algae are away.
    But still, some flashy green algae continue to slowly grow.. I'd describe them like a tissue.. developping like a carpet on substrate or plant leaves.. its kind of compact... By the color, I'd say they're not harmful for the tank, even the color is pretty!
    But as it seems to be an algae.. better to take no chances..

    Here's some pictures.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Ooh and I have a bad news wich is also goodat the same time, I discovered 2 planaria last week..... It's bad considerind I had 2 berried red crystal shrimps wich gave birth last weekend... And I don't see anymore baby shrimp..
    But its good to know because I'll soon get some No-planaria to get rid of them.

    Thanks,
    Ohly
     
  6. ShadowMac

    ShadowMac Moderator Staff Member

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    Hi Ohly,

    The algae you are referring to is known as blue-green algae (BGA) and is actually a photosynthetic cyanobacteria. It is a bothersome algae and you should begin taking measures to take care of it.

    From your photos I can see your HC is in poor health. This is most likely due to a poor supply of CO2. The withering HC and most likely other plants have added organics to the water column as well. The planaria are likely a sign of decreasing water quality.

    Here are some steps I suggest. 1) Increase your CO2 slowly over time while watching for some positive responses from your plants and be watchful for stress to your fish and shrimp. 2) Physically remove as much of the BGA as you can and give your tank a good cleaning and water change. Continue with frequent water changes while dialing in the CO2 and tackling the algae. Probably 3 times a week for a couple weeks. 3) if these steps do not eliminate the BGA it may be time for a series of blackouts. The root cause is most likely not enough CO2. You should watch for the plant to spread along the substrate and shoot out roots, these are good signs of healthy growth.

    Good luck!
     
  7. Ohly

    Ohly Aspiring Aquascaper

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    the HC may look bad because i did not brush it before i took the pictures, because there is also something like light brown/grey particles that comes and stick to the HC leaves and even eleocharis parvula.. but most of the time it sticks to the HC
    be carefull, i say it stick to the HC but a soft pass with a tooth-brush and everithing is .. looking like dust in the tank.. i guess maybe its some kind of dead organic mater..

    when brushed, the HC look healthier !

    both HC and Eleocharis spread slowly..

    this week some eleocharis grown like lightning! in maybe 3 days some got at least 2cm taller!! ^^
     
  8. ShadowMac

    ShadowMac Moderator Staff Member

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    Ohly, it is not dust that makes your HC look in poor health, it is the growth. There are very few leaves.. The dust (diatoms) and the BGA are signs things aren't going quite right. It is best to pay attention to those signs early. HC does not spread slowly, it is quite a weed actually.
     
  9. Ohly

    Ohly Aspiring Aquascaper

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    Ooh the cyanobacteria is quite a problem!!
    This bacteria is a big concern during summer in my Province... Since a couple of years this bacteria has reached many lakes making some parts of them hazardous for swimming or even drinking !

    I will try something to get rid of it, it is not the most natural way to eleminate it but I'll try a cyanobacteria remover.

    I'll see what's the worth for that technique.

    About the diatoms, it is already in its way to cleaning, last week I've bought an otocinclus.

    And about the withering HC, should I replace it ? Because it may be a part of the problem with the quality of the water.

    Thanks again

    Ohly
     
  10. ShadowMac

    ShadowMac Moderator Staff Member

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    The plant is dying because of the conditions, so don't replace. The new HC you get will have the same problems. It will bounce back quickly if you can meet its needs. Your tank needs more CO2.

    I don't recommend a cyanobacteria remover, chemicals could be harmful to your shrimp. You need to fix what allowed it to start to grow aggressively in your tank. You must improve the health of your plants.
     
  11. keithgh

    keithgh Moderator Staff Member

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    Ohly

    When you use Chemicals to fix a concern it often gives you another concern, the only way is find out what is causing the problem and fix that its the only safe way.

    Keith:):)
     
  12. Ohly

    Ohly Aspiring Aquascaper

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    So i already bought the cyano remover.. I'll keep it just in case some day cyano get uncontrolable..

    For the past month or so, I've been really busy.. and having only short periods of time to maintain the tank... Soon I'm gonna contact seachem with all informations needed.
     
  13. Garuf

    Garuf Moderator Staff Member

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  14. Ohly

    Ohly Aspiring Aquascaper

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    I have problem getting higher CO2 level.... Maybe the diffuser makes too big bubbles.

    I have a GH/KH test kit from Hagen or nutrafin..
    If I'm right, with 1 bubble every 2sec and setting to 1.5 bubble every seconds, i measures always between 20 to 30mg/L of "something CO3"...
    Is a co2 reactor is a best investment? It the maintenance the same as a glass diffuser?
     
  15. ShadowMac

    ShadowMac Moderator Staff Member

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    A reactor shouldn't be necessary for a tank of your size.

    What process are you using to measure your CO2? Could you describe it? Are you using the kH/pH chart?

    Could you post a video of your CO2 system in action? something simple as your phone camera could work. Bubble counter and diffuser.

    The plants are telling you to add more CO2, so rely on that and not your measurement.
     
  16. Ohly

    Ohly Aspiring Aquascaper

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    here is the requested video

     
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  17. ShadowMac

    ShadowMac Moderator Staff Member

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    Thanks, Ohly. No reason to apologize for your English. I couldn't understand a bit of French, even after one semester of it in college.

    Thanks for the video. You are missing a step in your dKh calculations. You first multiply by 10 to get the ppm. Then multiply by 0.056 to get the degrees. you have probably 30 ppm x 0.056= 1.68 dKH. Seems your water is quite soft. Not a big deal and easily dealt with.

    Do you have a pH measurement? If you know your pH and your KH you can estimate your CO2 ppm.

    Off the bat I would say, yes you are correct those large bubbles from the ceramic diffuser are a problem. It is probably not dissolving too well. One thing that may help: It is best to position your CO2 on the opposite side of the tank as your outlet so the current hits the bubbles and pushes them down extending the time they are in the water.

    The bubbling (pearling) of your plants shows they are getting enough light, now we just have to get them enough CO2.

    What is your GH? You use the same calculation methods as the kH. # of drops x 10 x 0.056 = dGH
     
  18. ShadowMac

    ShadowMac Moderator Staff Member

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    KH/pH CO2 table:

    [​IMG]
     
  19. Ohly

    Ohly Aspiring Aquascaper

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    Last Ph test i did : between 5.5 and 6.8
     
  20. ShadowMac

    ShadowMac Moderator Staff Member

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    Okay, that is a wide range. We need something more specific. Also at the time it was read.

    If your pH was 5.5 and your kH was 1.68 (lets say 2) then your CO2 ppm according to the chart would be in excess of 60 ppm. That is very high and most likely your fish and shrimp would be showing signs of stress and your plants wouldn't be showing the growth issues. So using deductive reasoning we can say your pH is not 5.5 and that would be a bad measurement.

    Lets go to the other end: 6.8 pH and KH of 2. Your CO2 ppm according to the chart would be 9.4 ppm. This is low and also fits with our observations of plant health. You want between 25 ppm and 40 ppm. You can go higher, but with caution. Some have reliably measure up to 80 ppm, however this is with surface skimming and wet/dry filtration.

    To be sure we need a more accurate measure of pH.

    I would try to test the pH before CO2 turns on, half way through your photoperiod, and then at lights off. You can test more in between if you like. Also do a corresponding KH test at each one of those measures. We will then use that information to see what your estimated CO2 is at that time. You can, if you were inclined, graph the information over time to see how your CO2 levels are throughout your photoperiod.

    I think I will do this as an example in my 90p tank thread. It will be good for folks to see how it is done.
     
    Last edited: Nov 1, 2013
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