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Lindsay's 20L

Discussion in 'Aquascaping Journals' started by Linds, Mar 6, 2013.

  1. Linds

    Linds Aspiring Aquascaper

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    I figured the pressure was building in the line to a point where it equalised. But I have over 30psi. I have never seen a fog from it yet.

    That sounds reasonable to be, but I strongly doubt this is the case in my tank. I say this because up until last week my photoperiod was only 6h. If my tank can't gas off in 18h there is something wrong. Secondly I went away and the tank didn't get a water change for over 2 weeks. My fish would have been dead had it been accumulating at any noticeable rate. Thirdly yesterday when my fish started showing signs of stress I turned the CO2 of and it only took an hour for the co2 to drop back to an ok level.

    Are you sure your fish are CO2 stressed and not stressed by a buildup of something else? I mean you could be right that it is the CO2 but what makes you sure it is?

    The regulator is pretty good quality as far as I can tell. It's not a cheap one. when the pressure has built up I can fully open my needle valve and it makes no difference (which is what I would expect). Maybe the atomiser is not very good. That would be my bet. Problem is living in Australia. There are relatively few options as to what I can buy. I don't like glass (in tank) diffusers because I hate the look in my tank (I know I have ugly filter inlet and outlets but only because I don't have the money to change them yet). So when I go on a forum like this and you guys talk about this and that brand they often just aren't available here. There are Australian forums but they have very few members into the planted tanks in the same way as people on here. It just makes things harder. not to mention that it is usually twice the price to buy things here. than most other places in the world.

    You can do the vid if you like but I think I get the concept. I'd like to know how it compares to mine (the DIY one) and how much CO2 it can dissolve. Good luck with IAPLC. I might have to look into designing another DIY.

    Linds
     

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  2. Linds

    Linds Aspiring Aquascaper

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    They have moved to Spring St. They said they used to be somewhere else, can't remember. I am very excited but also don't want to leave home again. I love it here.

    I have a load of large rocks ready for a certain shop when I bring my first load of stuff down in the Ute. He ordered them for a client's huge tank he is scaping. I might see if I can help with it. This will be my third load of rocks to that shop. :)

    Linds
     
  3. ptiJo

    ptiJo Active Aquascaper

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    Indeed, I misunderstood what you did. Sorry :)
     
  4. Linds

    Linds Aspiring Aquascaper

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    No worries.

    So I found a shrimp today. It was dead :(

    ShadowMac may have been right, again today the drop checker was blue. Hardly any CO2 is going into the tank. One of my plants has nearly totally melted today. I'm thinking I should take the fish back to a shop and pull the tank down until I move and start again. It has been a very good learning tool for me. I can't expect my parents to look after it while I'm moving etc. So it is probably the best option.

    The good thing is I haven't wasted a lot on the tank. Most of the things I can reuse when I set it up again. So it's only really a val and a bit of HG and my fish I'm going to lose. I'm going to try some soil next setup.

    Thoughts?

    Lindsay
     
  5. greenfinger 2

    greenfinger 2 Active Aquascaper

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    Hi Linds , Sorry to hear all not going well :( Congratulations on being accepted into M-S-F :cool: Hope all go's well with the move . But leaving all that stunning country side behind:( But as you said you have to go where the work is.Keep us all updated as soon as you settle in :) As to soil as a substrate why not Have seen lots of people using that.Think you cook it first to get rid of any nasty stuff :) What will happen to school tanks now that you are leaving ?(y)Cheers roy
     
  6. Linds

    Linds Aspiring Aquascaper

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    I haven't decided if I'm going to use MTS or aquasoil. Just depends.

    The school tanks aren't viable now as I don't have any time to do it at this stage.

    Linds
     
  7. ptiJo

    ptiJo Active Aquascaper

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    Sorry to hear the tank failed :-/

    As a low-tech user, what I'll do is (take the animals out) take the water out, clean the glass but leave the hardscape (sand and its dirt included), re-fill with 100% "clean" water and add some easy plants (like lemna trisulca and/or ceratophyllum) and maybe have a bit of pothos bathing in your tank too. Then add the snails and asselus. And watch it for a week or two. If the tank is OK, the snails will survive and the asellus should clean the sand ; and the plants should keep green and start to grow. After a week or two, depending on the tank look, I'd put the fish and shrimps back. After a month or two, I'd take the Cerato (and lemna) out of the tank (but keep the pothos bathing). During this time, all you need is light for the plants to "eat" and to generate O2. Because it is low-tech, re-used sand and those plants, you shouldn't have to bother about nitrates.
     
  8. Linds

    Linds Aspiring Aquascaper

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    Hi Jo.

    I don't think the tank failed. It has been going well, just that I went away and because it was high tech it grew algae. The only problem I'm having now is my CO2 has stopped which is not good for my plants. My fish are fine and so is everything else except a shrimp. But if I don't solve this CO2 soon I will have lots of algae.

    I have discovered that most of the plants I like don't do very well in gravel so I want to try soil.

    My water is fine. The glass is clean. I just feel I should take it down rather than try and fix it when I'm moving soon.

    I've never seen lemna trisulca. I don't know if you can get it here. But it is a floating plant and I don't like them as a rule. Not in a tank, in a pond they are nice but I don't look at the top of my tank much.

    ceratophyllum is too big for this tank. I might try it in my other tank though since it is good for low light levels.

    Why do you say to use pothos?

    If I could get asellus I would, but I have no idea where I would get them.

    I have snails in there already and they are doing fine.

    The problem I have with your idea is that I'd have algae in no time. There is too much light. You might have some good ideas for my low tech tank. I asked some questions about it last night. The link is in my signature.

    :)

    Linds
     
  9. ptiJo

    ptiJo Active Aquascaper

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    OK. I got to re-read the whole thread so. 'Cause what I thought was that you were invested by algae after you went away for a few days and that you lost nearly all your shrimps and one fish...

    Pothos "eat" nitrates. Just put the base of stem in the water (leaves must stay out of water) and wait for it to grow roots. It will then work as a "natural" filter using what's usually considered as bad for livings for it's own growth. The problem is it does not always meet the look of the tank you want :D

    But once again, I thought your tank was dying and you were to redo it all.

    I got my asellus from an e-shop (in France). But you may be able to find some outside.

    The "80L low light" does not look low-tech to me :)
    I quickly re-read the last 3 pages and there loads of CO2 and ferts reference. No idea how to answer the last question and ferts and water change :)
     
  10. Linds

    Linds Aspiring Aquascaper

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    Lol, I can see what you thought just reading the last part. :)


    Yeah. I love it as an indoor plant but I don't like the look of roots floating in my tank :p

    I will look, they are interesting.

    Yeah, I suppose. What I really want to know is how do I make it more low tech? I've already got algae on the higher parts of the tank. I'm afraid if I stop with the ferts I'll get more.

    Linds
     
  11. ptiJo

    ptiJo Active Aquascaper

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    Well... I can't answer that question ; as I never used (articifial) ferts.
    This is the algae is get in my low-tech riparium. Those are acceptable for me because shrimps and snails feed from it. If you want to got (more) low-tech, you have to read/learn about the natural chemistry that happens ; the international entry point may be the Walstad method. But for sure, you can't replace in a 1:1 manner ; you have to "rethink" your tank to be able to self sustain. If you were able to read french, I'd give you an URL to a blog that describes how to maintain tank without anything more than light ; although not all fishes supports this.
     
  12. discusaigon

    discusaigon New Member

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  13. ptiJo

    ptiJo Active Aquascaper

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  14. Linds

    Linds Aspiring Aquascaper

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    If that sort of algae on my rocks was what I was getting I would be happy. I actually like green algae like that on rocks. But I am getting ugly brown stuff that I have the look of.

    I'm pretty good on the chemistry side. It was my favorite subject at school and I still enjoy it. Like you say, I can't just convert to the Walstad method because I'd have to totally redo the tank. Maybe I'll just try not using ferts for a week and see what happens. If I do I'll either get heaps of algae or I may get none. I will get a few snails too. maybe I should transfer the shrimp from my other tank to this one. I did have 4 in there but I haven't seen them since I put them in there except for one I found on the floor so I don't know if they are alive. There are enough fish to fertilise my plants a bit. But I know from experience that if I don't dose anything I will have algae problems. I know this because that is what I have had in the past with this tank and light. But maybe the CO2 is enough to keep it at bay.

    Linds
     
  15. Linds

    Linds Aspiring Aquascaper

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    I have translated the pages, might give me some idea of what it's about even if the translation isn't great.

    Thanks
     
  16. ptiJo

    ptiJo Active Aquascaper

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    I don't remember which is which. But "green" algae and "brown" algae are similar is that they appear when there is to much nutriments in the tank. There is a trick to get rid of algae (just check the Internet if it applies to brown one) : put the tank is total darkness for a week. The algae should die when the plants should survive. Beware that I never tested this method myself... ;-) Only tested than my Tetra Amandae and Betta splendens can stay a whole week without feeding.
     
  17. Linds

    Linds Aspiring Aquascaper

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    That's not entirely true. If it were everyone dosing with the EI method would have algae. Also, when I went away for a week I got algae in my tank, I wasn't home to add fertiliser. I had no algae problems before I stopped adding fertiliser. It is more often caused by too much light for the amount of nutrients and not enough CO2 in the water. That's why I have algae up the top of my 80L tank and not on the bottom.

    I wouldn't like to do that with my fish in the tank.

    Apparently breaking up the light period into two with a couple of hours gap in between stops it growing but plants are able to cope with it.

    Linds
     
  18. ShadowMac

    ShadowMac Moderator Staff Member

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    Hi Linds,

    Sorry you are having troubles. It really isn't anything most other hobbyists haven't gone through themselves. CO2 is one of the hardest things to get right and keep right.

    A restart isn't the worst idea. You can take what you have learned and apply it to a fresh start. I'm looking forward to such a restart myself when I move at the end of the month. My tanks look great, but time for something new.

    I think the nutrients cause algae is something that has bled over from the salty side of the hobby as they control algae that way, there is nothing in the water to compete with it in a saltwater. Also, zero algae is unrealistic. The ones even successful hobbyists struggle with are GDA and green hair algae as they seem to be able to do well even when plants do well. The brown stuff and GSA, BGA, are all signs things are out of whack. Your plant observations are telling you its CO2 and that is what I think too. With the lower plant density you could have been running into problems despite good growth. On the next one plant it as dense as you can manage right from the start.

    I wouldn't do a black out for more than 3 days. You can repeat after several days again. It helps, but without fixing the cause you will find yourself back to square one. A good manual cleaning can be just as effective as well as removing all infected leaves. The most effective way I have used to rid myself of BBA is a good dosing of excel. Twice the recommended dose for one week kills it very effectively. Works great for staghorn algae too. I wouldn't recommend it as a routine, but I use excel in standard doses to help control for algae. Watch the shrimp for big issues, but I haven't killed any doing it.

    Its strange to say, but even with all the science in this hobby it seems you still have to get a feel for it before you find a great deal of success. Combine that with all those great "touched up" photos creating an unrealistic expectation and you find yourself a bit frustrated. A fresh restart can help fix that.
     
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  19. Linds

    Linds Aspiring Aquascaper

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    Yeah, it's ok. I don't mind challenges. I just wish it was consistent. My diffuser decided to work again.

    Yeah. I took the fish to a LFS the other day and took the rocks and shrimp out and a big snail. Now at least I can 't gas anything except some snails.

    Sounds good. I have some rocks I want to use. Just want to work out what style to go with. I liked the one I had so maybe similar.

    As you say, I'd rather fix the cause than deal with the removal. To a large extent it went away once I started with ferts again. Apparently Excel kills val. My val was growing like crazy.

    Hopefully you will see a new and improved scape very soon.

    Linds
     
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