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Is the brown stuffs covering my tank glass algae? Or soil dirt?

Discussion in 'Algae' started by Rhexis07, Feb 5, 2016.

  1. Rhexis07

    Rhexis07 New Member

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    I recently made some changes to my tank. Took out most of the plants as they were not surviving more than 2 months.

    [​IMG]

    This is my tank. I took reference from http://www.urbanaquaria.com/2013/01/13-litre-nano-tank.html

    [​IMG]

    wanting just something really simple. But after changing to this, I realized my tank's glass has brown spots on it quicker than before. I used to do cleaning on my tank's glass once every two weeks, but now I have to do it once every week.

    Also, my filters are getting brown a lot quicker too.

    Are the brown stuffs diatom algae? Or are they caused by the soil? The soil has been around for maybe 5 months+.

    I have 3 neon tetra, 4 gold tetra and 3 rummy noses. All of my fishes are doing very well currently (they used to not be swimming much and a few of the tetras died.). I took the initiative to separate some of my fishes that I thought were ill and after a week they seemed fine and I placed them back and now they're normal again.

    My Shrimps aren't doing so well. My 3/5 of my CRS died in 2 weeks. My Cherries are doing much better. 3 of them have survived more than 2 months (which I'm really happy after many trial and errors)

    Thank you for your advises in advance. I hope to receive some help on my tank's algae, and if it's algae, how can I prevent them from getting worse. :)
     
    Last edited: Feb 5, 2016
  2. J Art

    J Art Aspiring Aquascaper

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  3. Solcielo lawrencia

    Solcielo lawrencia Aspiring Aquascaper

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    Probably excess trace nutrients are in the water. The algae can use the extra nutrients, hence the reason why they are growing. Doing larger and more frequent water changes would be prudent.
     
  4. keithgh

    keithgh Moderator Staff Member

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    Rhexis07

    Can you post a full report on your tank please?

    All the water parameters and how it was done and product brand if possible.

    List every thing including the quantity and how often.

    Even your feeding.

    Water changes what percentage and how often.

    Filtration type and how often is your filter maintained.

    You must find what is causing all your concerns before it can be fixed.

    Carbon are you using any if so why?

    Keith:cat::cat:
     
  5. Rhexis07

    Rhexis07 New Member

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    Hi all, thanks for the quick response.

    I haven't really gotten myself a water test kit, but others I can answer.

    My tank is 40x20x30 in size

    I feed my fishes Tetra food. They are really fine grains that the fishes don't need to nimble. Gotten this to replace my older food because my fishes weren't really eating that very well. I feed them twice a day once in morning and night. The food sinks to the bottom of the tank if uneaten, but I do not feed a lot so if it falls, the shrimps would hopefully eat them.

    I change my water once a week now, about 40% water change. I leave my water overnight before changing (my local pet mart told me to do so because of alkaline / chlorine). I also put some anti chlorine in the water I'm about to change while it's left overnight.

    I use a Carbon Slim Filter with 2 Filter Cartridges. And I use another smaller filter which is just a normal filter. I wash my filter whenever I change my water so once a week as well. Full wash.

    I have 4 Gold Tetras, 3 Neon, 3 Rummy Nose, 3 Cherry Shrimps and 2 RCS Shrimps.

    I had initially thought it was the soil's dirt causing my tank to become a little dirty, but I noticed my plants and my rocks were becoming browinish too. I'm doing my water change tomorrow so will be wiping my tank clean once again.

    I do not use any CO2 since I do not have a lot of plants.

    I'm using a 36cm LED white light. I replaced it with my older 25cm one which wasn't bright enough. I turn my lights on at least 12 hours a day while I'm away at work.

    Only changes I have made recently were the plants, the food and the lights (along with just a few new fishes)

    I've read about the excess nutrients. I am thinking of getting a few new plants to absorb excessive nutrients. That might help, right?

    Thanks all!
     
    derfliw likes this.
  6. keithgh

    keithgh Moderator Staff Member

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    Rhexis07

    Carbon not required as the carbon stores all the nasties it collects it can create a very nasty mix of chemical then return them via the filter.

    Carbon is an excellent product but not to be left in filter all the time

    A water full parameter report will certainly help can you get a full test done at your LFS

    Do you wash every thing under the tap or old tank water.

    I always added Seachem Stability at every water change to keep the good bacteria healthy.

    I stored my water for one week to remove the very heavy chlorine no chemicals added to do the job.

    It might help to do two 40% water changes a week to help in removing the problem.

    Its not a matter of fixing the problem you must locate the cause and fix that as well.

    Keith:cat::cat:
     
  7. Rhexis07

    Rhexis07 New Member

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    Hi Keith, thanks for the response again.

    I will take note on the carbon part. Mine is a carbon + sponge filter, so yes, it's probably building up some chemicals.

    I usually wash my filter wish hot tap water. My tap water can get really hot so I tend to use it to give it a good clean and scrub. Then once done I'll wash it with warm water again. I wish most of my filter items with a good rinse of hot water first.

    My local pet mart advised me to just leave it overnight will do, and a small dose of anti chlorine will do the job. I guess the chlorine level in different countries differ. I live in Singapore so my tap water are safe to drink kind. There's chlorine but probably not very high.

    I'm gonna do a 50% water change tomorrow. The algae is definitely building up. My filters are turning brown. I'm giving them a wash now first.
     
  8. keithgh

    keithgh Moderator Staff Member

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    Rhexis07

    This could be the problem every time you wash the filter under a tap hot or cold you are washing all your good bacteria away and with chlorine in your water supply this does not help either.

    You must wash all your filter material in the old tank water.

    Its most important to get a full water test done as soon as possible.

    Can you get Seachem Stability or Sera Nitrivec (this is as good as many LFS will say but 99.9% it will not do the job. )

    Keith:cat::cat:
     
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  9. ShadowMac

    ShadowMac Moderator Staff Member

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    How can you say this when you do not even know if he is dosing fertilizers or in what amounts?

    The brown "algae" is most likely diatoms. The OP is washing his filters out with hot tap water weekly. The tank has never been able to establish a good filter. Stop washing the filter under hot water, do as Keith described and only every 3-4 weeks.

    Diatoms sometimes appear in the beginning of a tanks setup when things are just starting to cycle. Since you are regularly zapping all your filter bacteria and probably substrate bacteria if not using a dechlorinator then the tank is constantly having to re-cycle....thus leading to the continual appearance of diatoms.

    @keithgh , carbon does not release "chemicals" back into the water. Once bound they are sequestered within the carbon matrix. Once all available chemical bonds are taken, the carbon can no longer absorb but does not release the compounds bound.
     
  10. ShadowMac

    ShadowMac Moderator Staff Member

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    Also, if your water utility company uses chloramine then leaving it out overnight will not remove the chloramine. Best to use a product like seachem prime.
     
  11. ShadowMac

    ShadowMac Moderator Staff Member

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    You could also reduce the time your light is on. It looks like you are only growing moss, so you do not need much light. I wouldn't recommend keeping a light on for more than 10 hours a day.
     
  12. keithgh

    keithgh Moderator Staff Member

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    Shawn thank you I should have worded that reply differently.

    Keith:cat::cat:
     

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