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Help: Corydoras Pygmaeus lower or higher ph

Discussion in 'Fish' started by Cip, Mar 14, 2016.

  1. Cip

    Cip Aspiring Aquascaper

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    Was wondering what is best for corydoras, lower range of ph or higher range, from what I've learned they go ok between 6.4 - 7.5 pH, I have 2 establish tanks, 30L and a 45L, the 30L one has ~7.6pH and the 45L has ~6.2pH,
    because I'll buy like 10 of them I incline to the 45L one.

    Maybe someone can advise ?

    Thank you much!
     

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  2. keithgh

    keithgh Moderator Staff Member

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    pH I would try to keep it as neutral as possible, they also have other recommended requirements a minimum of 40+lt and a good clean sandy substrate.

    As to how many per tank I would check with http://www.aqadvisor.com/ as a good guide.

    Keith:cat::cat:
     
  3. Cip

    Cip Aspiring Aquascaper

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    I studied all the articles, also that tool is great, I've used it at the beginning but it's just theory. You can have an overstocked tank if you are on top of your maintenance and also you have good biological filtration.

    Corys can have a wide range of parameters but I guess it depends on where do you get them from. The guy from which I'll get the corys keeps them in 7.5pH, if I get them and put them in a neutral water, is that a good thing ? I mean it's a difference of 0.5 which translates into 100000 less alkaline than the water that they are used to.

    Correct me please if I'm wrong with my rookie thinking.

    So the question is should I risk keeping them in a 6.2pH or go on a safe route and keep them in a 7.6pH ?

    Thank you much Keith for your advices!
     
  4. ShadowMac

    ShadowMac Moderator Staff Member

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    Here is the thing with pH, it is an indirect measure of other things... Most often pH is not as important as KH, since KH can impact a fish's osmoregulation. KH is a more direct measure of what is important as far as freshwater fish go. Of course salinity is another factor that effects osmoregulation, but we do not need to be concerned about this in freshwater.

    Fish can adapt to a wide range, the trick is to not shock them and to avoid fast sudden changes. Drip acclimation is best because it allows their physiology to adjust slowly to their new environment. You do not need to match the water parameters of where you received the fish. If this was the case many of us would be unable to keep fish. If you acclimate them slowly you should be able to put them in either tank.

    A nice fish resource I use: www.seriouslyfish.com
     
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  5. Cip

    Cip Aspiring Aquascaper

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    Thank you Mac for your detailed advise, I've used drip acclimation for my CBS, for how long it is advised for fish to be drip acclimate ? I kept the shrimps about 2 hours and no deaths, but I guess that for fish is different ?!

    Cheers.
     
  6. ShadowMac

    ShadowMac Moderator Staff Member

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    2 hours should be sufficient

    sent from tapatalk on my phone so auto correct and other errors are bound to happen
     
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  7. keithgh

    keithgh Moderator Staff Member

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    All I every did over many years as the new inhabitants were about to be added I would first turn the lights off, float the bag in a net this would slowly bring the temperature to the same as the tank and about every 15min add a little of the tank water over the next 2 hrs.

    I would leave the lights off then introduce the new inhabitants and feed the next morning after the lights came on.

    Keith:cat::cat:
     
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  8. Cip

    Cip Aspiring Aquascaper

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    Thank you Keith. This is how I've done it for the shrimps that I introduced to the tank, I though that for fishes it's different, longer period or something else.

    This is how I'll do it for the corys I'll post here an update after they are safe in the tank.
     
  9. keithgh

    keithgh Moderator Staff Member

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    I forgot to add I put the fish in a net after they have been acclimatized and the water in the bag goes down the drain or on the garden.

    I never added that water to my tank.

    Keith:cat::cat:
     
  10. Cip

    Cip Aspiring Aquascaper

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    I catch them shrimps in the bag :) , the water in which they come is filthy, due to stress the animals go to the bathroom often, also it can carry all sort of bacteria and nasty stuff :). I did my research first of course.
     
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  11. keithgh

    keithgh Moderator Staff Member

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    Have you ever noticed when some LFS add fish to a sales tank they "might" float the bag but when it comes to adding the fish every thing goes into the sales tank.

    That is a great example for new comers to aquariums where many treat their new friends at the LFS as "they know every thing"

    Keith:cat::cat:
     
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  12. Cip

    Cip Aspiring Aquascaper

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    I agree with you Keith, for the last few months I've spent a lot of time in several LFS, the things I saw there ...
     
  13. Cip

    Cip Aspiring Aquascaper

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    Quick question for you guys. I've read more about kH and GH but I couldn't answer one question, does kH = 0 kills fish ? I know that kH 0 means that there is no buffer for pH and at night pH can swing alot due to fish respiration etc. Can you help answer this for me ? maybe I don't have the brain for it.
     
  14. keithgh

    keithgh Moderator Staff Member

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    I am not a water expert but I do know is every thing in your tank must be compatible with the kH and the GH also the pH.

    If your inhabitants are not suited to the water conditions they are they are not going to live a happy long life.

    That is the reason for getting your inhabitants to suit your conditions or make your conditions to suit the inhabitants.

    It goes back to nature look at the conditions they come from in the wild.

    Keith:cat::cat:
     
  15. Cip

    Cip Aspiring Aquascaper

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    I don't agree :), the fish that we get from the LFS or local breeders don't grow them in water conditions from the wild.

    I've read somewhere that instead of trying to get the perfect pH or other water param for the fish, it's better to keep the parameters stable. Like I said having kH 0 there's little buffer for the pH and thus it can swing between night and day, how big of a swing I don't know, I think we can find out through experimentation.

    Interesting discussion :) maybe other members can join.
     
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  16. Cip

    Cip Aspiring Aquascaper

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    It just hit me, Shirakura Red Bee sand, which I have in the shrimp tank stabilizes pH, kH and GH for the caridinas to thrive, so the substrate is a buffer, and I bet after a good acclimatization the corys will do just fine. I can't wait to see if I'm right or wrong.
     
  17. Cip

    Cip Aspiring Aquascaper

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    I'm happy to let you know that the corys are safe in the tank, after a long acclimatization last night. They are well, started exploring everything. here is a video with some of them:

     
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  18. keithgh

    keithgh Moderator Staff Member

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    I agree that most are not from the wild but, would they be breed in conditions similar to their natural habitat.

    Let me put it this way, fish that naturally soft water would have difficulty in living in a tank with hard water.

    pH there are recommended levels for different fish but that does not mean they cannot survive above or below the recommended level.

    Certainly keeping you tank at a constant level is the best thing to do.

    Keith:cat::cat:
     
  19. Cip

    Cip Aspiring Aquascaper

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    I agree.

    I've read that these corys breed in pH of 6.5, for now I'm just enjoying this small fish, if I decide to breed them I'll setup a breeding tank.

    I agree, pH is logarithmic that means that 7.1 is 10 times more alkaline then 7.0 and 6.4 is 10 times more acidic then 6.5, it's advisable to keep it in the specified range.
     
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  20. keithgh

    keithgh Moderator Staff Member

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    This is referring to some wild SW fish, they will wait in the SW at the mouth of a river or creek until the water is perfect for them by that I mean more FW coming out.

    When they think its OK they will swim upstream until they get the perfect conditions to breed and that is very little SW in the FW coming down stream, after breeding they will return to the SW.

    Keith:cat::cat:
     
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