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Hello from South Texas!

Discussion in 'Introductions and Greetings' started by 1EyedTuna, Mar 10, 2014.

  1. 1EyedTuna

    1EyedTuna New Member

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    Recently I have been delving deep into the world of aquascaping. I realized one day as I was tending to my terrestrial plants in my aquaponic system that I might as well bring the garden into the fish tank as well! I am very frustrated with myself for not getting into this side of aquariums sooner! A103.jpg
     
  2. ShadowMac

    ShadowMac Moderator Staff Member

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    Welcome to ASW!
     
  3. keithgh

    keithgh Moderator Staff Member

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    Hello 1EyedTuna, welcome to ASW can you fill in your location and Country please.

    Keith:):)
     
  4. greenfinger 2

    greenfinger 2 Active Aquascaper

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    Hi 1EyeTuna, Welcome to ASW:)
     
  5. 1EyedTuna

    1EyedTuna New Member

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    So I have got some questions guys. I have a friend who had some micro swords and amazon sword plants as you can see in the photo I posted above, so I have worked with them a little. Now I have some sort of black sand, unsure of the exact type as I have had it for a very long time. I am using a T8 fluorescent light that is using the higher spectrum of light around 6000k. Having said all that, how will these particular plants perform?
     
  6. ShadowMac

    ShadowMac Moderator Staff Member

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    Since it would seem you have some familiarity with plants I'll jump right in. Spectrum does not matter as long as it is within the photosynthetic range, most plants are good at adapting to the various kelvin temps (4000-12000k) Aquarists generally choose a mix that is most pleasing to their eyes. I personally like to blend a pink bulb (4500k) with a (10,000k) and a couple daylight (6500k). A lot of folks seem to like something that appears in the 8000k range. What matters most with lights is the PAR value. Some plants can grow with low levels 40 micromols. The range is generally between 40 and 120 micromols. Exceeding 60-80 range would mean you are going to need CO2 supplementation.

    I'm guessing your black sand is seachem flourite. Some level of water column and substrate fertilizers would be a good idea. Root tabs and periodic liquids.

    What is the wattage of the t8? what is the size of aquarium it is over? What type of equipment are you using for flow/filtration? Supplementing CO2? Fertilizers? any other additives? Maintenance routine?

    The answer to how will these plants do is much more complicated than substrate and light. Generally the swords you have don't need particularly high light, CO2 supplementation is helpful but in low light they can do fine without it. They are iron demanding. The large sword seems to still be in its emergent growth form. Watch for the formation of new leaves. The first thing I like to look for to determine my plants health is new root growth. If they are putting out many new roots, I know they are relatively happy.
     
    greenfinger 2 and keithgh like this.
  7. keithgh

    keithgh Moderator Staff Member

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    1EyedTuna

    Looks like Shawn has given you some excellent advice there, I have never grown Swords but I do know they are very heavy feeders and once established can become very large plants.

    Keith:):)
     
  8. 1EyedTuna

    1EyedTuna New Member

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    Thank you guys for the advice! Any advice on pretty hardy plants that don't grow very large and like sand?
     
  9. ShadowMac

    ShadowMac Moderator Staff Member

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    most epiphytes like java ferns, anubias, bolbitus ferns won't care about substrate. Cryptocoryne genus is hardy, root tabs would be good for them. Swords are fairly tough too and a favorite of low tech folks with big tanks. Those are the plants mostly recommended as hardy and not requiring CO2 or higher light levels.
     

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