1. Welcome to AquaScaping World!

    Become a register member to get FULL SITE ACCESS AND BENEFITS.

    Join the ASW community now!

    Dismiss Notice
  1. chizamp

    chizamp New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2008
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Colorado
    I just recently setup a 4 gallon tank, but the only hardscape i have in it is one piece of mopani wood that i purchased from Petco. I went to some other LFS and couldn't find any wood or rocks small enough for a 4 gallon tank. I was wondering if anyone here knew of a place online that would sell hardscape materials that would be small enough for a 4 gallon? Or if anyone had any they aren't using and are willing to sell? Thanks.
     
  2. Pat7676

    Pat7676 New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2008
    Likes Received:
    9
    Location:
    Jackson, Mississippi
    I think i might have some at home i could send you some pics tonight.
     
  3. Fikus

    Fikus New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2008
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Belgrade, Serbia
    With a little force, good will, skills and high quality hammer, you can design a rock that could perfectly fit your tank. Same thing is with driftwood.

    So many times, it is just impossible to find some appropriate piece of hard scape we actually need for a tank so often, it's easier to make it than to find in some shop available piece with appropriate size and shape.


    Rgds,


    Filip Todorovic - Fikus
     
  4. chizamp

    chizamp New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2008
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Colorado

    Thanks, that would be great!
     
  5. John N.

    John N. Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2007
    Likes Received:
    343
    Location:
    California
    Some of the best rocks to get "commericially" can be found from Aquaforest Aquarium

    It is slightly expensive, but you'll get a great selection of rocks to chose from. I recently ordered a $60 box of Seiryu Stone and I'm very impressed with the packing and quantity or rocks. The ryuth stone is another great rock if you need an alternative. Here's a shot of it.

    [​IMG]
    Ryuth Stone Photo from Eric (Insomniaclush)

    -John N.
     
  6. Chadly

    Chadly New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2008
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Okemos, MI
    I usually just go outside, find a few rocks that look the same, have the same color, determine the size I need and pick them up off the ground or dig them out of the dirt. You can't go wrong finding your own rocks. I do the same with wood. Of course you have to prepare them by boiling and/or scrubbing them to clean them off.
     
  7. alphacat

    alphacat New Member

    Joined:
    May 19, 2008
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    San Francisco, CA
    All great options mentioned so far, but Chadly's post needs a clarification: you need to make sure whatever rock you throw in there isn't going to mess with PH or hardness, as rocks like Limestone do. And if you live in a place where pesticides of any sort are used (ironically, usually agricultural areas), be careful with just picking any old wood. It may have pesticides which boiling alone won't remove. Avoid young green wood and wood with essential oils (pine, eucalyptus, etc.) too.

    As for rock, a simple test some folks use is to put a drop of muriatic acid (available at some hardware or art stores for glass etching) on the intended rock - if it bubbles, you're in trouble. Alternately, local quarries often have slag heaps of rock that you may be able to grab some small stuff for - especially rocks like granite and slate, which are generally aquarium safe.

    Aquaforest is a really one of a kind outfit; I'm lucky enough to live 5 blocks away from them though! If you ever visit SF, it's a must-see. Their customer service has always been exceptional in my experience and that of others I know who go there. You could do worse than ordering from them.
     

Share This Page

Sponsored link: