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General guidance for algae control

Discussion in 'Algae' started by rodorojasf, Jun 18, 2014.

  1. rodorojasf

    rodorojasf New Member

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    Hi aquascapers!. I'm new to your forum and not even a beginner to the planted aquarium.
    I am conducting an experiment to learn the basics and apply then to I full sized planted aquarium.

    Currently we have a small, three litter glass cilinder with an aquatic plant (I don't know its name) and an independent 4-liter biorreactor. A small pump injects air to the biorrector loaded with rotten organic matter, then a plastic hose collects the CO2- enriched air (from the organic matter decomposition) and bubble it into the aquarium platform filter.

    This fixture has been working for just for two days and now the aquarium is completely full of some filamentous algae.


    I hope to get your advice and expertise to make a compehensive list of the guidelines, strategies, products and practices (chemical, biological and physical) to control it (as I said, this is an experiment).

    Respectfully
    Rodrigo
     
    Last edited: Jun 18, 2014
    keithgh likes this.
  2. greenfinger 2

    greenfinger 2 Active Aquascaper

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    Hi Rodrigo, Welcome to ASW :) Interesting idea :) I thought rotten stuff gave of Methane :eek: But had a Google :D When enriched with Oxygen it gives off Co2 Well i never new that :D But you are putting more Oxygen in your water than Co2 :( Why not use yeast & sugar in a two liter bottle pure Co2 last 3-4 days depending on temp :)
    What lights are you using ?? Hope it not by a window:( This will kick start algae very quickly:(:(
    Do you do regular water changes this helps in the first stages to combat algae ??
    Can you post a photo this will help a lot :) Then we will know what plant you have ;) The algae you have sound like hair algae ??
     
    Last edited: Jun 18, 2014
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  3. rodorojasf

    rodorojasf New Member

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    Thanks greenfinger 2. Yeast was my first choice, but prefer rotten matter because I want to join processes (ie. compost) and there is a high availability of it.

    Cell respiration breaks down carbohydraes (even complexes ones) in an aerobic environment in order to get energy (as ATP) with CO2 as a byproduct.

    You are right. The main source of light is a near window, I'll move the aquarium. I was thinking to use a blue or cold white LED light (blue because this is the main wavelength that plants use).

    Sent from my Lumia 710 using Tapatalk
     
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  4. greenfinger 2

    greenfinger 2 Active Aquascaper

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    Hi Rodrigo, As to lights i use 6500k 1ow & 30w flood lights and 6500k GLS bulbs all lights are daylight and my plants growing well :)
     
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  5. ShadowMac

    ShadowMac Moderator Staff Member

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    Hello Rodrigo and welcome to ASW!

    The paradigm you are operating under is the wrong one. To grow a beautiful planted tank you do not want to combat algae, you want to grow plants well. So you need to think in terms of how to grow plants not kill algae.

    I've recently come across a much more interesting way to DIY CO2 than yeast. DIY citric acid reaction to yield CO2.

    While I admire your inquisitive and experimental approach I'm afraid you are over complicating it. If you can grow plants well you will not grow algae. In the absence of healthy plants conditions can grow algae, but in the presence of healthy plants those same conditions will not grow algae.

    Since it seems you are familiar with your bio and chemistry you may want to determine how effective your system is. How much CO2 are you really getting out of it? and is it worth it? If the system isn't really effective you might want to consider a non CO2 tank or getting a pressurized system. Or even trying the citric acid DIY CO2.

    You may also want to be cautious of byproduct entering your system.
     
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  6. greenfinger 2

    greenfinger 2 Active Aquascaper

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    Hi Rodrigo, As Shawn said Diy citric acid :cool: Have a look at Zgmarkozg Thread (y) Calm river page 7 in journals about 3--4 down all the links are there for this method :D Diy yeast 4 days citric acid 10 days :cool:
     
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  7. rodorojasf

    rodorojasf New Member

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    Sent from my Lumia 710 using Tapatalk
     
  8. rodorojasf

    rodorojasf New Member

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    greenfinger 2 and shadowmac. Yor're right, my biorreactor has started to produce some kind of foam that has been unexpectedly delivered to the aquarium :(. I know that my system is much more complicated but it's a challenge. The change of paradigm is an advice that I really appreciate.
    The system has been moved away from the window and provided with two 4W LED light (a blue and a cold white). I agree that ignorance of efficency is a major weakness. Do you know a DIY technique to measure CO2 in water or air?.

    Kindly regards


    Sent from my Lumia 710 using Tapatalk
     
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  9. niko

    niko New Member

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    Rodrigo,

    Your idea of supplying CO2 using a natural process is very, very good. The details need to be worked out but the idea is excellent.

    The aquascaping hobby is stuck in certain ways of thinking. Many important things are never discussed. One topic that is never discussed is the way to run the planted tank in an optimal way. This means very precise establishment and very precise addition of any kind of substance. A planted aquarium should not be run with a lot of CO2 (pH of 6.8 at a hardness of 3-5 is optimal). That means that a natural way of producing and supplying CO2 makes a lot of sense. The usual mentality, especially in the USA, is "more is better". Excessive levels of CO2 are one example of biased understanding - the excessive CO2 concentration has a profound impact on both the biofilter and the stability of the tank. That is one example of how problems are never really solved, always ready to arise very quickly, and solutions are never clear. Most people have not even heard of excessive CO2 levels negatively impacting anything else but the fish.

    Your decomposing matter reactor needs to be setup in such a way that it solves the following issues:
    1. Consistency of CO2 production based on the setup (volume, surface area, material selection, material movement?)
    2. Regeneration of the reactor so it runs consistently.
    3. Safe delivery of the CO2
    4. Simplicity of setup, operation, and maintenance.

    Hope you start to see that you have introduced a concept for a new approach to CO2 production/delivery in the planted tank hobby. Hope you understand that it will take a lot for the idea to be embraced.

    Good luck.
     
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  10. keithgh

    keithgh Moderator Staff Member

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    rodorojasf

    A very big welcome to ASW can you fill in your location and country please.

    I have never used CO2 I will leave this to the experts who are helping you.

    Keith:):)
     

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