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Gathering Info. Your input is needed

Discussion in 'Introductions and Greetings' started by Ange, Apr 20, 2016.

  1. Ange

    Ange New Member

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    Hey guys,

    So I'm new to everything that is aqua plants and scaping and I'm just trying to gather some highly needed information about the best brand of aquariums to use, lighting, filters, etc.

    I want to set up an aquascape as a present for my father and I'll be starting from scratch. 5-10 gallons would be the size range I'm going for ( 6 preferably ).

    as for the plants and thing inside the tank, nothing too advance would be good.

    Any advice on plants and styles for small aquariums would also be HIGHLY appreciated.
     
  2. lucasgg

    lucasgg Active Aquascaper

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    Eheim makes great canister filters, just make sure to get the classic line. I'd start with a driftwood setup.
     
  3. ShadowMac

    ShadowMac Moderator Staff Member

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    Has your father kept and aquarium before? What type of work would he be willing to put into the tank? Aquascapes require more care than standard plant-less aquariums. A tank with a few nice easy to grow plants could keep maintenance at a minimum.

    I hate to be a naysayer, but sometimes giving pets or living things as gifts really mean handing someone work and responsibility. Is he game for that? I know this isn't what you asked for...just making sure you have considered it.

    A very easy minimal work aquascape would have a sand substrate with some driftwood and anubias tied to the wood. Low light would be good.

    DoAqua tanks are nice and less money than the rimless low iron glass tanks.

    ADA tanks are some of the best you can get and aren't overly spendy at the small sizes. The difference between the DoAqua and ADA is the use of higher clarity low iron glass.

    A simple small tank wouldn't be tough. Here is my list of equipment for you:

    25-35 cm rimless tank (from either of the above)

    LED light

    Heater

    Substrate

    Driftwood, lots of places to look for this. Get something that fits nicely in the tank
     
  4. ShadowMac

    ShadowMac Moderator Staff Member

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    you can do a sponge filter, a HOB, or a small canister

    plants can be anything small from this list that has LOW CO2 demand

    Fish could be a betta or boraras brigittae with dwarf shrimp like red cherry shrimp
     
  5. Ange

    Ange New Member

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    He's owned aquariums before but never a planted one, or at least not to my knowledge. I was hoping this could be a hobby we both might share in the future. As for the maintenance, I will be handling it. I actually live with my father so it's really no big deal. I believe once he's seen it and falls in love with it, him taking care of it will be no problem.

    ShadowMac, Your list is actually very helpful so I thank you for that. I'm looking for a beginner tank that will teach me the basics without overwhelming me.

    Once I've established a good small tank I'd like to move on to something bigger in the future. With that goal in mind, would sand, a piece of wood, and a tied down plant be too simple or is that exactly where I should start?
     
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  6. keithgh

    keithgh Moderator Staff Member

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    Welcome to ASW

    My first advice would be forget Dr Goggle you can be given a lot of incorrect information.

    Visit as many Aquariums in your area look and ask question BUT do not buy any thing at all much of your equiptment can be bought on the WWW from reliable dealers.
    See if there is an Aquarium Club in your area this would certainly help you.

    I would start of with a larger aquarium first a 3ft is a good starter tank .you will find it will be far easier to work on and with the smaller the tank leaves you with very little area for any mistakes or concerns that often arise.

    One major point to learn before you start the Aquarium hobby is not cheap do all your costing first then the upkeep costings.

    Because of the costing you might consider a kit aquarium this is certainly not recommended as it usually made to a price to get you interested first.

    A few things for you to consider.

    Keith:cat::cat:
     
  7. ShadowMac

    ShadowMac Moderator Staff Member

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    @Keith A 3 ft tank would be expensive and require more expensive equipment a small Nano would suit there needs best IMO.

    I also disagree it is easier to work on, maintenance takes longer and is more difficult. The large water volume can be more forgiving but you have to really be doing something wrong to torch a small setup.

    sent from tapatalk on my phone so auto correct and other errors are bound to happen
     
  8. Ange

    Ange New Member

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    Yeah, I'm not sure about the 3 footer either. The thing is I'd like to first see how the whole process is with a smaller tank and not overwhelm myself with a bigger, more demanding tank. And I know it's pricey, that's why I rather start off small and see if it's something I'd want to continue to pursue. Starting off big might set me up for failure.

    I'm researching everything I need or the things people tell me I should get ( @ShadowMac thanks for helping me with the things I should be looking at) and planning on cost and budgeting now so when I do start it, I won't be surprised by the amount of money I need to have this hobby.

    I haven't the time to really go to aquariums but I have the Internet, isn't that the next best thing? Haha

    @keithgh thanks for the input, I appreciate you taking the time to reply
     
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  9. keithgh

    keithgh Moderator Staff Member

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    I am only speaking from experience my 45lt was the most difficult to set up and maintain compared to all the other tanks 3ft, 4ft, 5ft and a 6ft marine I had over the years.

    Keith:cat::cat:
     
  10. 1077

    1077 New Member

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    I'm on board with Keithgh.
    Water quality in smaller volumes of water are more quickly affected by too much food,too many fish,lapse maint (vacation's/sickness).
    Larger tank's in my humble opinion can tolerate more of the afore mentioned than smaller volume of water.(dilution capabilities)
    With that said, smaller tank's make good quarantine tanks and are great way to prevent disease in your display tank,cheaper to dose med's in than large tank heaven forbid med's are needed.
     
  11. ShadowMac

    ShadowMac Moderator Staff Member

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    I think folks are missing the request of the OP. Ange asked for an easy inexpensive starter that would require the least maintenance. Yes a large tank has greater stability...but it is also a substantially larger investment. I'm certainly not disagreeing on the merits of a larger aquarium...but how does this get to what the OP wanted? Sure a 3 ft tank can be setup to where it does not need careful attention...but it will also cost much more.

    Small aquascapes are not difficult. My 35 cm is a cake walk. Just change a small amount of water and dose a small amount of ferts. This is not rocket science and small tanks are more friendly to beginner budgets as well as space considerations. Why do we think nano tanks have become so very popular...

    Small tanks are also great learning tools as you can setup and tank down easily. If something goes wrong it is relatively easy to start over. You learn more because you can do more scapes in a short period of time.

    Also, starting out as has been advised with a low light, non CO2 planted tank...it is not hard at all.

    Sometimes I swear "we" as in us in the hobby like to make this out to be harder than it is...everyone is capable of doing it and the same core principles apply to success in small, medium, or large tanks. Regular maintenance, regular water changes, appropriate stocking levels, appropriate selection of equipment and fish. ALL of which is easier and cheaper in a smaller tank. Larger tanks are more forgiving to the undisciplined scaper.

    So Ange, do you want more of a set it and forget it tank or do you want something to learn in at minimal investment (of which will not be overly demanding anyways)
     
  12. 1077

    1077 New Member

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    My apologies if I misunderstood what was posted.
    I thought OP had already decided on small 5 to 10 gal tank (preferably 6gal).
    Having set up dozen's of such tank's over some fifteen year's for classroom project's, they too can be successful with regular maint and minimal investment.
    Just presenting both sides,/measured opinion's,such as one might expect on a forum.
     
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  13. Ange

    Ange New Member

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    I was looking for something small as a BASE jump for learning and what not.
     
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  14. keithgh

    keithgh Moderator Staff Member

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    Ange

    Let me put it this way you certainly will learn a lot more starting with a small tank.

    Keith:cat::cat:
     
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