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"Friendship" - Dennerle 20L Cube

Discussion in 'Aquascaping Journals' started by Jurijs mit JS, Jun 9, 2009.

  1. Jurijs mit JS

    Jurijs mit JS Admin Staff Member

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    Hi,
    Sunday I have done another Dennerle 20L Cube for a friend.

    Size: 20x20x25cm - 20Liter
    Filter: AquaEL Fan Filter1 Plus 320lph
    Heater: AquaEL nano heater - 25°C
    Light: Dennerle 11Watt - 6h/day
    Substrate: ADA AS Amazonia
    Co2: Pressurized 0,5kg bottle - 1bbl/4sec
    Hardscape: Ohko Stones
    Plants: UG, E.Parvula

    Hope this time to have more success with UG :deadhorse: otherwise it has been my last attempt on this plant for the next few scapes :D

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Any comments and critizism are welcome
     

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  2. Raven

    Raven New Member

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    Nice stones and I do like the slope!
    I think urticularia will demand more light than 11w.
    But since its not yours, this time it will maybe succeed :D
     
  3. Jurijs mit JS

    Jurijs mit JS Admin Staff Member

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    Thanks Raven,
    I have the same sized nano and I run 2x11Watt. Only success is awesome algae growth :rain:
     
  4. James Marshall

    James Marshall New Member

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    Hi Jur4ik

    I have a 20 litre tank with 2 x 24Watt lamps on it. I used to suffer with terrible algae problems, I tried raising the CO2 levels, i tried more ferts, i tried less ferts, i tried massive doses of Excel, all with little effect. However after reading an article on fluctuating PH, during the lights on period, causing algae, I started doing my daily water changes before the lights switch on. This made a huge difference and over a 2 week period the algae almost disappeared.

    Cheers James
     
  5. Jurijs mit JS

    Jurijs mit JS Admin Staff Member

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    wow, thanks James :proud:
    will try this out on my own nano
     
  6. Raven

    Raven New Member

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    That sounds very interesting ! can we read this article too? Please post a link.
     
  7. James Marshall

    James Marshall New Member

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    The article was in "Practical Fish Keeping" magazine, and was written by George Farmer. I don't think i still have the magazine, and i can't find the exact article on the PFK website, but if you search the site for articles by George, you may find he mentions the subject. His articles are well worth a read anyway.

    Cheers James
     
  8. saintly

    saintly Aspiring Aquascaper

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    i always make sure all WC is done 2 hours before lights on, or i'll do it directly after lights off.

    nice tank jur4ik, but you know i like it from UKAPS B-)
     
  9. Jurijs mit JS

    Jurijs mit JS Admin Staff Member

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    hehe :chestbumping:

    here is a little update :((

    [​IMG]
     

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  10. Jurijs mit JS

    Jurijs mit JS Admin Staff Member

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    one more piece of UG melted away and the third one is on the way, whats wrong?!

    Hairgrass got some new runners and leaves :)
     
  11. saintly

    saintly Aspiring Aquascaper

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    sounds like a difficult plant my friend. I'm not sure what to suggest

    i really want to try this soon.
     
  12. Jurijs mit JS

    Jurijs mit JS Admin Staff Member

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    Hi Mark,

    The guy is doing wc nearly every day and till now no ferts. wanted to wait until things start going a bit to avoid algae. But no ferts cant be the reason for melting :((

    Today a solenoid for my own nano arrived, is already installed - hope it will help stop fluctuating PH lvl and will help me get rid of the algae issue I have in there [-o<

    I have placed some more orders today. 5l of TPN+ , 10kg Seriyu Stone and some Black Wood for a new 40x20x20cm nano set up :muscle:
     
  13. James Marshall

    James Marshall New Member

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    Hi Jur4ik

    I found this on the tropica website, sorry about pasting the whole thing, but i could not get the hyperlink to work.

    Utricularia graminifolia – the carnivorous foreground plant
    by Ole Pedersen, Troels Andersen and Claus Christensen Utricularia graminifolia (Tropica No 049B) belongs to the most interesting water plants. It is carnivorous and creates an attractive green carpet in the foreground within a couple of months. Utricularia graminifolia may be difficult to start up but once it has gotten a firm grip in the aquarium, it offers a unique experience for the aquarist. The tiny trapping devices may inspire long discussions among family members and friends as carnivorous plants always stimulate people’s curiosity.
    [​IMG][​IMG]Utricularia graminifolia in its natural habitat on the edge of a shaded stream in southern Vietnam. The plant grows partly submerged and partly emerged among the leaf litter. Utricularia graminifolia belongs to the bladderwort family (Lentibulariaceae) and originates in SE Asia where it has been found in the southern China, India, Sri Lanka, Burma, Laos and Vietnam. At those sites, it appears as amphibious swamp plant as well as totally submerged in springs and along small streams. Its natural habitat is often shaded and it rarely grows in full sunlight. It always grew in very soft water where we found it and we had severe difficulties keeping it alive during transportation. Fortunately, the plant that is being produced now is much sturdier and thus, more suitable for use in aquaria but it remains a plant for the specialist. Utricularia aurea is another bladderwort which occasionally is found in the shops but it looks completely different with a growth form similar to species of Ceratophyllum and Myriophyllum. [​IMG][​IMG]Close-up of the trapping devices on Utricularia graminifolia that are used to catch crustaceans and ciliates. The animals contain nitrogen and phosphorous that can be used by the plant after the tissue has been dissolved by enzymes in the tiny traps. Photo by Oliver Knott. Bladderworts are all carnivorous plants and many of them are associated with water. The genus name “Utricularia” refers to the bladders (trapping devices) whereas the species name “graminifolia” refers to the grass-leaved leaves. The grass-leaved leaves are exactly what distinguish it from the other approximately 210 species of bladderworts that have been described so far. The tiny grass-leaved leaves form an imbricate structure of freshly green leaves, which normally covers the bladders that are formed on the rhizome and the midribs. It flowers when it grows emerged. However, what makes Utricularia graminifolia unique to the aquarist is the tiny 2 mm long bladders that in nature traps crustaceans and ciliates seeking shelter among leaves and rhizomes. The animals are digested by enzymes secreted by the into the bladders, and the released nutrients are subsequently taken up by the plant and used to support new growth. Utricularia graminifolia often grows in very nutrient poor environments and thus, it is a huge advantage to be able to explore alternative nutrient sources of particularly nitrogen (N) and phosphorous (P) by trapping nutritious animals.
    [​IMG][​IMG]Here, Utricularia graminifolia is used in aquascaping where it forms a green stream in the aquarium. The plant may also be used as ordinary foreground plant where it forms a continuous green carpet 6-8 week after planting. Photo by Oliver Knott. Tropica grows Utricularia graminifolia emergent and it is supplied on either stone wool or coir discs. When planted in the aquarium, the clod should be divided into 6 to 8 smaller pieces and planted with a distance of 5 cm in the foreground of the aquarium or on a slope in the aquascape. It is important to keep about 1 cm of the coir or stone wool in order to provide good anchoring of the plants. Using tweezers to insert the tiny blocks of plants makes the entire process of planting much easier. To begin with, Utricularia graminifolia should be offered relatively low light but after the initial 6-8 weeks, where after the plants have obtained a firm hold in the aquarium, the light may be increased. At this point in time, the tiny blocks have now been transformed into a continuous grass-like carpet and this is the time where PLANT NUTRITION liquid should be supplied in order to prevent iron and manganese deficiencies. Our experience with Utricularia graminifolia shows that it is doing best at a pH of 6.8 to 7.0 in water of 7-10 dKh hardness. Fertilization with CO2 is not required but if supplied, the growth is stimulated significantly. Although the commercially available variety is sturdier that the wild type, the initial phase after planting may prove critical since the Utricularia graminifolia is sensitive to environmental changes. Thus, make sure that the recommendations are followed and keep other fast-growing plants out of the new patches with Utricularia graminifolia until the plants are well established in the aquarium. Utricularia graminifolia is relatively fragile and thus, it should not be kept with fishes with burrowing behaviour.
     
  14. Jurijs mit JS

    Jurijs mit JS Admin Staff Member

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    Thanks James,

    As I told I now have installed a solenoid to stop fluctuating ph lvls to stop the algae issue in my own nano. In the "Frienship" there is a solenoid right from the start so ph lvls should have been constant, there is not much light and no fish. I wonder why UG is melting. As told in the article UG prefers 7-10 dKh and our tap water is very soft, only 3dKh, the usage of ADA AS lowers the hardness too so there is a dKh of 1° or something like this. Maybe because of the low hardness and the small tank size there are still fluctuating ph lvls what causes algae issues and as UG is so fragile it starts melting .. :confused:

    The famous tank of Oliver Knott with awesome UG in there is much bigger than it looks on photos, in real it is about 90Liters^^ and his tap water has 10+ dKh.
    Well, I wont use it any more in nano tanks as it is too expansive for trial and error expirience, here in Germany 10€/pot! In my nano a small piece of UG is still alive maybe it will recover and than I will give it one day a one more chance :D
     
  15. samc

    samc New Member

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    hey jur4ik i belive you should slowly introduce UG to light, this is what i did and only had a few bit melt upping the co2 might help
     
  16. Jurijs mit JS

    Jurijs mit JS Admin Staff Member

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    well co2 might be a reason but not the lightning.

    in the following I will call the this "Friendship" Tank nano2 and my own nano1:

    nano1 2x11watt ; Co2 1b/2sec ; ferts right from the start
    nano2 1x11watt ; Co2 1b/3-4sec ; no ferts

    nano1 - no melting but algae issue
    nano2 - melting but no algae issue
    :ehhh:

    My next nano I will give UG one more chance but will only use few bits of it.
    Actualy I think it is better to introduce UG after all other plants have settled and the tank is cycled.
     
  17. TYB

    TYB New Member

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    That is what I did and no luck, it just fade away...maybe I think I can see some new green in one of the plantings but I just don't know...maybe I only see what I like to see...
    My scape "Babysteps of Aquascaping" has evolved and a carpet plant like UG is the only thing that is missing...

    TYB
     
  18. Jurijs mit JS

    Jurijs mit JS Admin Staff Member

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    better try glosso, this one should work for sure :))

    My mate told me that more pieces of UG are melting .. :((
    He is reporting that in his opinion UG begins to melt under the soil near the stonewool and it is because of the stonewool - can any one comment on this?

    In my opinion stonewool shouldn´t be a problem, as everybody is using this method and even tropica advice to do it this way. :-?
     
  19. Jurijs mit JS

    Jurijs mit JS Admin Staff Member

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    here is an update from today. due to UG melting the foreground looks a bit empty and please excuse me for the poor quality, done quickly with webcam.

    [​IMG]
     
  20. Jurijs mit JS

    Jurijs mit JS Admin Staff Member

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    this is what´s left .. :((

    [​IMG]

    Hairgrass is doing fine, lots of runners.

    Now there is a something like brown algae on the UG near the bottom .. Co2 has been increased to 1b/2sec and started dosing tropica plant nutrition 1ml after each wc
     

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