1. Welcome to AquaScaping World!

    Become a register member to get FULL SITE ACCESS AND BENEFITS.

    Join the ASW community now!

    Dismiss Notice

Esha Exit whitespot treatment

Discussion in 'Shrimp and Invertz' started by Stickling100, Aug 31, 2012.

  1. Stickling100

    Stickling100 Aspiring Aquascaper

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2012
    Likes Received:
    19
    Location:
    UK
    Hi Guys

    One of my female swordtails is showing the usual signs of whitespot I have Esha Exit from a previous treatment, I have Amano & Cherry shrimp any ideas if they'll will be ok? theres no way I could get them out of the tank.

    There's a few people on the PKF forum that have used it with shrimp, without side effects.

    Thanks
    Sam
     
  2. Garuf

    Garuf Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2009
    Likes Received:
    360
    Location:
    Leeds, England.
    You have to be very very careful dosing medication in main tanks because wood, substrates etc will all absorb it which can lead to problems, medications can also lead to dropping oxygen levels, damage to the plants and to the general balance of the tank.

    Try turning all the lights off in the room as well as the tank lights for a few hours and catching the fish with a torch while it's just woken up and sluggish if that fails then consider it carefully before hand and dose exactly to the letter of the dosing instructions.

    Have a read of this link:
    http://www.skepticalaquarist.com/ichthyophthirius
     
  3. Stickling100

    Stickling100 Aspiring Aquascaper

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2012
    Likes Received:
    19
    Location:
    UK
    Hi Garuf

    I've had whitespot before and read loads of info at the time, not sure if i've read this one I've scanned it and will give it a read through tomorrow.

    I'm not 100% sure medication is the right way to go, I only have one fish showing white marks on her Caudal fin & pectoral fin's.
    I did have an incident last week with gasping fish as I had let the top plants cover too much and increased the CO2, once I increased the oxygen levels all seemed to be fine.
    I am noticing my black neons have more gill movement than usual but no other signs ie: decrease in appetite, scratching or white marks, so maybe thats in my head!!:confused:

    I'm pretty sure it's whitespot but is there anyway to be sure?
    how would you treat if you had whitespot?

    BTW-I bought a drop checker which is green through the day with only one diy co2 bottle!!! I bought a regulator which arrived yesterday i'm just looking into a bottle supply, which is proving more of a nightmare than expected but I suspect that's because it's new territory!

    Any news on the job front?
     
  4. Stickling100

    Stickling100 Aspiring Aquascaper

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2012
    Likes Received:
    19
    Location:
    UK
    Oh sorry if the link covers this but I am confussed by the torch method you described????
     
  5. Garuf

    Garuf Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2009
    Likes Received:
    360
    Location:
    Leeds, England.
    Sorry, the torch method is a way of catching the fish to treat it in isolation. I personally wouldn't ever medicate an aquascaped tank.The easiest fish to catch is a tired one. I'd then treat it either in a bucket of cheap plastic critter keep type tank of the kind you get from wiko's etc.

    Fire extinguishers are usually the cheapest place to get co2 in the UK.

    Are you using 4dkh solution in the drop checker? Don't get too caught up on the green, it's entirely relative no two tanks are the same and no two tanks will need the same amount of co2, they're best treated as a guide. I tend to watch the fish and plants once I've got the drop checker green to find the upper limit and I keep it at that level provided there's no algae. Gasping is a sign you were at the upper limits, I'm glad you cracked the reason on your own, you can run higher levels of co2 with more o2, reduce the o2 and the co2 can quickly become toxic. These are lessons normally learnt hard.

    No luck on the job front, thought I've not really been looking that hard with having spinal surgery and being in recovery at the minute. They'll be something.
     
  6. Stickling100

    Stickling100 Aspiring Aquascaper

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2012
    Likes Received:
    19
    Location:
    UK
    Ok so I have to admit I did find this article hard to follow in places.

    I knew Whitespot is caused by a parasite and that it has a life cycle, I assumed your advised to increase the temp to speed up this cycle and kill the parasite while vulnerable. My understanding is your treating the aquarium and the fish? if I have understood the article, this is correct your killing the parasite during the free-swimming life stages? So how can quarantining a fish and treating it do any good, surley Ich is still present in the aquarium therefore reinfestation is enevetable.

    yeah I am using 4dkh solution.

    Spinal surgery ouch!
     
  7. Garuf

    Garuf Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2009
    Likes Received:
    360
    Location:
    Leeds, England.
    Ahhh yes, I see your point...
    Hmm. It's not really my field of expertise but I think you're right in that it's a case of treating the tank in addition to just the fish but to me this seems problematic.

    http://www.aquaticplantcentral.com/...0147-how-cure-ich-without-harming-plants.html
    Seems to suggest lots of water changes and an increase in temperature will rid the tank of ick. I'd try that before medication.
     
  8. ShadowMac

    ShadowMac Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2010
    Likes Received:
    2,156
    Location:
    North Dakota, USA
    if its ich you are talking about then the temp increase above 86 F for 2 weeks will wipe it out. It is unable to complete its life cycle at that temp and dies. I have done it a couple times with great success. I would only caution that some mosses don't do well with the increased temp and if any are colder water fish you may want to remove them and treat them separate with a med in a hospital tank. It is always a good idea to have a spare ten gallon around for such cases, quarantine before adding to your main display tank.
     

Share This Page

Sponsored link: