1. Welcome to AquaScaping World!

    Become a register member to get FULL SITE ACCESS AND BENEFITS.

    Join the ASW community now!

    Dismiss Notice

December 2010: Aquascape of the Month - "Invitro Scaping"

Discussion in 'Aquascape of the Month (AOTM)' started by John N., Dec 10, 2010.

  1. John N.

    John N. Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2007
    Likes Received:
    343
    Location:
    California
    December 2010 Aquascape of the Month
    ______________________________________________
    Invitro Scaping
    by Maciek Michalski
    [​IMG]

    INTRODUCTION

    First of all I would like to thank the ASW Team for inviting me to the AOTM series – I feel honoured! I would like to showcase my Invitro Scape.

    Where did the idea "Invitro Scape" originate from?
    [float_right] [​IMG] [/float_right]

    The idea for this tank originated from two factors.

    First, we had the opportunity to test new type of plants. I used them before in a typical test tank, without considering the aquascape techniques much. We were really surprised by the quality and look of the plants – very fresh and bright, kind of different from traditional pot plants.

    The second factor was the fact, that our client was selling an aquarium set up with all the equipment. We decided to buy it from him and set up in the shop gallery for a while. For a couple of months I have wanted to try an aquascape without any hardscape materials – only plants. The opportunity was perfect for me – I had to try it!

    Any tips or advice for creating a planting map?
    [float_right] [​IMG][/float_right]

    The idea for the planting map was a bit unconventional for me. I usually create aquascapes using, what I would call “freestyle” methods – I have only a broad view of the aquascape – I never do plans, everything turns out when setting the hardscape and planting the plants. This time the first step was put the design on the computer monitor – not very creative and developing – but interesting new experience. If one decides to create such a map all that is need to know are the particular plant’s characteristics. When bought, in vitro plants are all very small – you can’t decide their final look from this form. So it is crucial to know the species and find information how will they look in a couple of weeks. A general rule of fore-, mid-, and background plants is adequate in this matter – just decide which plants are low growing and which are going to be suitable for the background.

    Second step is to decide what kind of composition is going to be created – concave, triangular etc. The number of plants you need can be specified by a simple rule, that one in-vitro portion is suitable for 10x10cm of the substrate area. For example, for a 60x30cm tank (which has 1800 cm2 area) you need 18 in-vitro cups to cover the whole substrate.
    [float_right] [​IMG] [/float_right]
    Of course if hardscape materials are used, less plants are needed. A planting map will be easy and fast tool to use by an advanced aquarist but a beginner will have to spend some time creating it successfully. In return, a newbie aquarist will achieve knowledge about plants and will be able to experience first hand observations of the plants that grow from a tiny form to mature, beautiful stems.

    How to prepare Invitro plants before planting?

    Preparation of the invitro plants is very easy. All you have to do is remove all the gel (or liquid in some cases) under the tap water. No wool, and dead leaves – that’s really convenient. Preparing the plants goes much quicker comparing to traditional pot plants.

    PLANTING TECHNIQUES

    In case of foreground plants, like Eleocharis parvula or Glossostigma elatinoides, it might be a good idea to split the whole cup into 4- 6 portions.
    [float_right] [​IMG] [/float_right]
    As for the stem plants – I prefer planting the whole cups. At the end one just need to put the portion into the substrate and watch it grow. In the first week a problems with floating the plants from the substrate might be experienced – just plant them back and give some time to establish.


    Invitro Scaping Style versus the Traditional Styles

    Let's be clear. I am not sure if we should talk about a new scaping style – as it is rather all about the way we use plants.

    For me, in-vitro plants are in many ways better than traditional ones. First of all you can quickly achieve dense clumps of the plants. I feel, they set up in the new aquarium faster than pot plants – they don’t need time to transform into submerse form.
    [float_right] [​IMG] [/float_right]
    In-vitro plants are already in, what I would like call, semi-submerse form. One will not experience any rotting of old leaves which is very important in the initial stage of an aquarium set up. Of course, the plants are free from any algae and snails, it is not very important to me, though.

    Also, my subjective opinion is that mature in-vitro plants are nicer than pot plants – leaves are nearly perfect, being fresh and bushy at the same time. The big drawback of the in-vitro plants is the fact of the limited species list. However, as this method is becoming offered by another nurseries, it might not be a problem in some time. In-vitro plants are also a bit more expensive than pot plants (but one get actually more stems so it is to be considered).

    Remember, it is not mandatory to use these kind of plants in order to have a nice aquarium, but everything that develops within our hobby is good for it. I am sure that in-vitro plants surely are.

    [float_right] [​IMG] [/float_right]



    Other Invitro Scape Design Plans (30x30cm, 60x30cm and 60x40cm)
    [​IMG] [​IMG]
    [​IMG] [​IMG]
     

    Attached Files:

  2. John N.

    John N. Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2007
    Likes Received:
    343
    Location:
    California
    This is a beautiful aquascape, and I really love the Invitro scaping method. It seems to create a fully loaded aquarium quite easily.

    -John N.
     
  3. ghostsword

    ghostsword Aspiring Aquascaper Staff Member

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2010
    Likes Received:
    58
    Location:
    Cape Town, South Africa
    It is outstanding, the way the plants develop and so full of color and vibrant. Great combination of shades of green, with then a dramatic splosh of red, just magical. :amillanbliss:
     
  4. tenshu

    tenshu New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2010
    Likes Received:
    5
    Location:
    Paris, France
    Where can i find the "templates" ?
    Any template with blyxa?
     
  5. Jurijs mit JS

    Jurijs mit JS Admin Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2008
    Likes Received:
    278
    Location:
    Germany
    The templates are done by Maciek, you can do your own - it is easy ;)

    30x30 cube template with Rotala in the back, is the one I´ll try soon, who is going to scape invitro with me? :party:
     
  6. tenshu

    tenshu New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2010
    Likes Received:
    5
    Location:
    Paris, France
    Well i'm just a beginner you know. I find this technic really interesting for novice. But for a novice it's hard to know wich plant fits with others.
     
  7. Jurijs mit JS

    Jurijs mit JS Admin Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2008
    Likes Received:
    278
    Location:
    Germany
    Maciek explains how to create such planting maps in the interview. But for the first trial you can just take one from above ;)
     
  8. tangelo1106

    tangelo1106 New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2010
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Austin CO
    I loved this technique from the first time I saw it. Now, if only I could get Tropica plants in the US. Does anyone know?
     
  9. Jurijs mit JS

    Jurijs mit JS Admin Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2008
    Likes Received:
    278
    Location:
    Germany
    Not sure, but ADG tried to, ask Xavier he is the ADG representative here at ASW.
    Or if you are ready to pay for, than you can import them europe
     
  10. Lingonfil

    Lingonfil New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2009
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Stockholm
    Can I ask what exactly is in-vitro plants? What's special about how they are grown?
     
  11. goldenic

    goldenic New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2011
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Indonesia
    this is the great invention!! many people would be confuse when setting a hardscape.. but with this method, people easily to fulfill with colorful plants without the hardscape.. and its also helpful for beginner to start aquascape.
     
  12. ghostsword

    ghostsword Aspiring Aquascaper Staff Member

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2010
    Likes Received:
    58
    Location:
    Cape Town, South Africa
    More information here:
    Tropica Aquarium Plants - News- 1-2-GROW

    Grown in sterile conditions, free from algae, snails and pests the 1-2-GROW! products offer you a sound start for your tank. Compared to normal aquatic pots, you also get lots of plant material per cup.
     
  13. Lingonfil

    Lingonfil New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2009
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Stockholm
    The link was unfortunatly not very informative...

    Forgive my lack of enthusiasm but I don't really see what's so fantastic with this product.

    Snails are an essential part when creating the miniature eco system that an aqarium is. And living oragnisms that are cultivated in sterile conditions doesn't sound like a sound way to do things.

    Besides I can imagine that those pots are more expensive.

    When a product evolves to become better AND cheaper, I will be sincerely impressed. Making things more complicated and more expensive does not impress me. What problem does this new product solve?
     
  14. ghostsword

    ghostsword Aspiring Aquascaper Staff Member

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2010
    Likes Received:
    58
    Location:
    Cape Town, South Africa
    I have a diferent opinion of 1-2-grow, I bought the pots a couple of times.

    In the UK, they cost close to £6, and the benefit is that there are more plants than on a rock wool pot.

    Also, the plants that grow on rock wool after a while on many LFS shops can get algae, and snails, which once introduced into a tank it is a pain to get rid off. Also, think about people that have shrimp and sudendly get introduced on their tanks some dragon fly ninphs. Or planaria, for example?

    I am all for biodiversity, etc, and all naturel, but our tanks as much as we want, are not a river, or are as natural as we would like to think so. :)

    Also plants from the 1-2-grow travel better, and can be kept on the pots longer, a major benefit for retailers as well.

    I see them as long life milk. :) How many people nowadays would go to a milkman to get a jar of milk?
     

Share This Page

Sponsored link: