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Bloodstream plant

Discussion in 'Aquatic Plants' started by audimurf, Mar 29, 2017.

  1. audimurf

    audimurf New Member

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    I saw a video the other day and for the life of me cannot find it again. It was about a river that has plants that look like a blood stream. Fast current

    Anybody have any info?
     
  2. keithgh

    keithgh Moderator Staff Member

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    audimurf

    Sorry I cannot help you no help on Google either.

    Keith:cat::cat:
     
  3. audimurf

    audimurf New Member

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    Keith, found it. Drool!



    Macarenia Clavigera

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    keithgh, kabriolet and Tim Harrison like this.
  4. Tim Harrison

    Tim Harrison Moderator Staff Member

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    Wow, that's amazing.
     
  5. keithgh

    keithgh Moderator Staff Member

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    audimurf

    Thank you very much, here are plenty of images to drool over.

    https://www.google.com.au/search?q=..._Rv__SAhUDbrwKHWBQAxgQsAQIGg&biw=1234&bih=683

    Like most Podostemacea, they will like current and good CO2 and yes, ferts. In open systems the nutrients are low but continuously replenished. This is rather tough to replicate in an aquarium. You can have a massive tank volume and then only a few plants/biomass. This makes it easier. Water changes help. Since most of the Podostemacae use modified root holdfast, moving them is tougher. You could get them started on small stones, then it is easier. CO2 will help. I'd not worry about temp so much, most all aquatic plants will do well up to 35-40C. I've seen evidence in the wild and in culture. the issue at higher temps is the metabolic growth rate also increases significant, the so called Q10 hypothesis, you get 2x the growth rate at 30C that you do at 20C. It's not quite that much in submersed cultures, but 50% is certainly not that far off. So 50% more ferts and CO2 demand. KH, not much of an issue, GH is.
    www.BarrReport.com

    Keith:cat::cat:
     

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