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Art Debate

Discussion in 'The Aqua Lounge' started by Supercoley1, Aug 4, 2011.

  1. youjettisonme

    youjettisonme Aspiring Aquascaper

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    It is a good point, and it works in more obvious ways in the music scene. One band/artist will be wildly successful with their original content, and then suddenly their are 100s of copycats, most of whom only claim to be influenced by the original artist, but then there are some who are so blind that they can not even admit this to themselves!

    It is one thing to reproduce an attractive element in a scape, but it is another thing entirely to reproduce a map or pattern of elements that has already been done to death. If they merely reflect what's already available in nature? That is perfectly fine and admirable, and you cannot make too many similar scapes of this fashion. If those elements are reproducing something that already looked gimmicky or artificial and isn't readily seen in nature? Then it is not so much a "Nature Aquarium" as much as a "Scaper Aquarium".

    Personally, one things I've always appreciated about the Amano cannon is their ability to represent what they are actually looking at when the visit a river or hike in the mountains, but on a much smaller scale. I just spent a lot of time in Yosemite this past weekend, and there is endless metaphor, endless inspiration, and all at your fingertips. To ignore that kind offering for the likes of copying a picture you saw on the internet just seems lazy.
     

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  2. ShadowMac

    ShadowMac Moderator Staff Member

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    great point about natural inspiration. there are plenty of places to get a great "design" other than someone elses.

    music is one place where the "copies" or mimics or whatever you want to lable them as really ANNOY me. probably because you cannot escape them. They are on the radio, tv, everywhere. And all in an effort to capitalize on a trend and make a quick buck.

    is it ironic how i would rather defend aquascapers who copy than musicians? One that really gets me is Vanilla Ice still claims that Ice Ice Baby was not a copy or inspired by Queen's under pressure. At least admit you were inspired or influenced by it.
     
  3. Supercoley1

    Supercoley1 Moderator Staff Member

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    To be honest I think Amano is more a case or 'influenced by' nature than replicating.

    His scaping conveys the essence of nature without trying to work to the exact image. It is less detailed whilst capturing the beauty.

    There are scapers these days that do try and replicate what they see to the finest detail. I have to be honest that to my eyes they resemble model train scenery and I have said this on many occasions.

    That said the technical ability to do this detail is not in question and I cannot say it isn't Art because it is only my eyes that decide for me I don't like it.

    For me those scapers/scapes aren't on the same path of Amano where instead of taking nature and using it's beauty to create something individual they are more like a direct replication, however I know I am pretty much in the minority when not liking these detailed scapes and I can accept that.

    Andy
     
  4. J House

    J House Moderator Staff Member

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    If someone created a great scape and wrote down detailed instructions to the most minute detail and someone followed those instructions to the letter and created the same scape. Is the product produced Art? Is that person a great Artist? Two different things I think.
     
  5. youjettisonme

    youjettisonme Aspiring Aquascaper

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    Luckily, that kind of episode is nearly impossible as there are too many variables in play, and that's part of what makes a scape so fascinating in relation to a piece of canvas, a brush, and some paints. Your water parameters, your ability to locate certain rocks, wood, and flora, your hardware, your fauna's effect on the environment you create... endless variants making the art of aquascaping anything but an exact science. As an artist's canvas is static while an aquascaper's canvas is alive and fluid, the "art" that we create will never remain. Part of what makes a flower so beautiful is for similar reasons... it's impermanence. Our scapes also have their seasons. Even if one were to gather all similar media, a small variant in the type of flora, for example, could change the whole spectrum of your scape. You thought you planted one type of hairgrass, but it was actually v. japan. Now, you have something unique, and entirely by accident.
     
  6. Kuni

    Kuni New Member

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    We may be in the minority, but my own preferences also match with this.

    Amano talks about this very issue in his latest book, where he describes the difference between the "Asian" and "German" styles of aquascaping. In the "Asian" style, an abovewater landscape is replicated in the aquarium. In the "German" style, the natural habitat of the fish is replicated, with or without good aquascaping principles. (Personally, I prefer a fusion of both)

    Amano does not follow either school precisely - his tanks rarely look like abovewater landscapes, but they do retain some of the basic design principles. Neither are they usually examples of a fish's natural habitat, even if they are beautiful and full of aquatic plants.

    I will say that it looks like the IAPLC judges favor the "Asian" style almost exclusively, given that many of the winning tanks look like abovewater landscapes in miniature.
     

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