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Amano shrimp, the undisputed champs

Discussion in 'Algae' started by ShadowMac, Apr 2, 2014.

  1. ShadowMac

    ShadowMac Moderator Staff Member

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    This nice little study conducted by Tropica shows the Amano shrimp as the most efficient algae eater in our algae combat crew. Be sure to include them in your aquascapes.

    http://www.tropica.com/en/tropica-abc/algae-control/effects-of-algae-eaters.aspx
     
  2. greenfinger 2

    greenfinger 2 Active Aquascaper

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    Hi Shawn, Nice link :cool: Amano shrimp They never stop working:D Great to watch too :rolleyes:
     
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  3. craig20102010

    craig20102010 Aspiring Aquascaper

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    Very cool. I might get some of these for my shrimp tank and possibly introduce them into my larger tank.
     
  4. Shadow

    Shadow Moderator Staff Member

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    Yeah it is good algae eater as long as there is no Cichlid or other predator fish in the tank. If you do, use SAE instead ;)
     
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  5. ShadowMac

    ShadowMac Moderator Staff Member

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    Good reminder Shadow, shrimp don't mix well with larger fish who like to eat invertebrates.

    As long as they are dwarf cichlids from South America you should be fine. Most apistogramma's won't bother shrimp. Blue rams will pick on neocardinia, but I've not seem them beat up on Amano's as long as they are larger.
     
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  6. Shadow

    Shadow Moderator Staff Member

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    On the contrary, in my personal experience, apistogramma's and rams do attack Yamato shrimp but maybe because they breeding at the time. It make them more aggressive.
     
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  7. ShadowMac

    ShadowMac Moderator Staff Member

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    It may differ with varieties. Really sucks when you see a Ram eat a ten dollar snack...

    My Apisto Borelli don't touch the shrimp. They scare them away from food pellets and eat the food, but not the shrimp. Rams were vicious to cherry shrimp.
     
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  8. Shadow

    Shadow Moderator Staff Member

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    possible, some species might be more aggressive than other
     
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  9. rodorojasf

    rodorojasf New Member

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    Thanks a lot for the info Shadowmac.

    Sent from my Lumia 710 using Tapatalk
     
  10. niko

    niko New Member

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    The Amano shrimp are very efficient in algea removal but ONLY if the tank does not produce too much algae. And moreover - Amanos do not eat all kinds of algae (BBA, Staghorn, Spot algae, BGA are the most common examples).

    Amano shrimp are usually "used" wrong - usually they are added in insufficient numbers. The average US planted tank suffers from excessive water column fertilizers and is normally loaded with organics. That creates a very algae-risky system which given the chance will easily produce way more algae than the few Amanos can consume.

    The use of Amano shrimp is optimal when the tank is run in such a way that algae are severely suppressed at all times. There is only one way to do that - lean water column with minimal fertilizers which are consumed quickly by the plants. The popular notion that algae can not be suppressed by reducing the water column fertilization is simply untrue. Both plants and algae stop or severely slow down their growth in water with low TDS, extremely low organics, and extremely low nutrients. In such an environment even a few Amano shrimp quickly consume all algae and look for sources of food that normally are left intact - mosses and plant leaves that they can damage.

    Amano shrimp used by themselves are not the optimal way to target the processing of algae and decomposing matter. A combination of certain fish, dwarf shrimp, snails, proper biofilter setup, organics removal resins, maintenance and mode of operation, as well as proper water flow pattern produce superior results. There isn't a single topic, anywhere, discussing and connecting these different parts of the aquarium system.
     
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  11. ShadowMac

    ShadowMac Moderator Staff Member

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    niko, I do agree that algae control requires a comprehensive approach. The purpose of the article was to show that amanos are more efficient than the other critters for control. Merely a good tool to have in the entire tool box. I also agree that amanos are typically stocked in insufficient amounts for effectiveness.

    However, I do disagree with your fertilizing concept. If this is true why do my tanks running EI dosing have little to no algae? Why do Tom Barr's tanks have little to no algae? These are tanks very rich in nutrients. Limiting an organism like algae by limiting its nutrients is possible, however our goal is to grow plants well. Plants will become limited long before algae is limited in this way. Expert aquarists may be able to walk the edge better than most, but for general success to the average hobbyists, non limiting nutrients provides good results.
     
  12. keithgh

    keithgh Moderator Staff Member

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    I had an Algae concern in both tanks not that far back I finally worked out it was a pH balance I was using as soon as I stopped and continued with the twice weekly water change the Algae is very slowly disappearing, also my plants are growing better than ever.

    I do not have any Algae eaters in the Shrimp tank.

    Keith:):)
     

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