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Am I lacking a fertilizer?

Discussion in 'Aquatic Plants' started by spartan.b42, Jun 9, 2017.

  1. spartan.b42

    spartan.b42 New Member

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    Hello I just started my first planted aquarium I have Water Wisteria (Hygrophila difformis) and I noticed a few of the leaves appeared to be dying, what could I be missing? I dose fertz using the EI method but I am not to sure I'm dosing enough trace elements as I'm using seachem trace for that. Is my plant lacking a nutrient? [​IMG][​IMG]

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  2. mexicat

    mexicat Aspiring Aquascaper

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    could be emersed leaves dying off
     
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  3. keithgh

    keithgh Moderator Staff Member

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  4. spartan.b42

    spartan.b42 New Member

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  5. keithgh

    keithgh Moderator Staff Member

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    spartan

    Glad I could assist you, keep us updated on the results of returning your plants to good health.

    Keith:cat::cat:
     
  6. hektek.hn

    hektek.hn New Member

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    EI dosing is great, but sometimes certain plants need to be fertilize through the roots and wisteria is definitely one of them. try throwing some root tabs and see how that works


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  7. keithgh

    keithgh Moderator Staff Member

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    I always used Seachem Fert Tabs as well as the liquid ferts around the base of the rooted plants.

    Keith:cat::cat:
     
  8. spartan.b42

    spartan.b42 New Member

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    I just recently added DIY osmocote plus tabs we will see if that improves anything. Some stems seem to be flourishing and some are getting darker and growing slower.

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  9. keithgh

    keithgh Moderator Staff Member

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    spartan
    Trying to find some information about those tabs other than forum chat I could not find any thing.
    The only factual thing I found was that "Osmocote" is a brand name.

    I would be doing a full water test every day to be on the safe side.

    Keith:cat::cat:
     
  10. spartan.b42

    spartan.b42 New Member

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    It is a slow release fertilizer that comes in tiny small beads, what I found was that this is an alternative to root tabs. What I did was get empty gel capsules and filled them with these tiny beads I then dug them all the way to the bottom of the tank, they are supposed to work similar to root tabs in the way that they will slowly release nutrients over the course of a few months. This is the thread with the most info that I have found if interested. http://www.aquaticplantcentral.com/forumapc/showthread.php?t=79468[​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]

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  11. keithgh

    keithgh Moderator Staff Member

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    I have been using plant ferts for over 50 years now and you always have to be extremely careful with the dosages as it can vary from plant to plant, the season and the soil type.

    To satisfy myself I have contacted Scotts the manufacturers of that product to find out if it is safe to use in an Aquarium with fish and plants.

    Keith:cat::cat:
     
  12. spartan.b42

    spartan.b42 New Member

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    Thank you luckily the the tank is only inhabited by one shrimp and a female guppy that accidentally came in with a few fish I bought she was raised in the tank they seem to be doing fine. I hope it's not also dangerous to my plants. If you could keep me updated on what Scots has to say about it I would appreciate it.

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  13. keithgh

    keithgh Moderator Staff Member

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    That is what I call service
    Date:
    14/06/2017

    Message:
    Hello Keith

    Scotts Australia has two entry level Osmocotes (Osmocote Outdoor and Osmocote Indoor) that are being packed in 500g tubs for sale exclusively through supermarkets (Woolworths and Coles primarily).

    Both these products contain loose prills (beads) that will float to the surface in aquariums and ponds unless they are contained in a small mesh bag like a pantihose toe and/or buried in the substrate gravel in the base of the tank or pond.

    We do have a product specifically for use in aquariums and ponds. See it on our website:

    www.scottsaustralia.com.au/scotts-brands/osmocote/osmocote-plus-trace-elements-controlled-release-plant-food/osmocote-plus-trace-elements-water-gardens-aquatic-plants/

    Our Osmocote Water Gardens & Aquatic Plants is manufactured in cones made from prills that are ''glued'' together in a cone shape. The weight of the cone is sufficient to stop it floating to the surface of a tank or pond. This product is made from an all purpose Osmocote.

    The loose prills of Osmocote Indoor and Osmocote Outdoor are exactly the same type of prill as is used in the Aquatics'' cones (the actual NPKs of these three may vary but the technology is the same).

    Provided the loose prills are anchored to the base of the aquarium either by burying them in the gravel substrate or holding them securely in a mesh bag with sufficient weight to prevenht floating, any of the aforementioned products can be used in tanks with fish in them.



    Keith:cat::cat:
     
  14. keithgh

    keithgh Moderator Staff Member

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    This is the product.
    Keith:cat::cat:
    [​IMG]
     
  15. spartan.b42

    spartan.b42 New Member

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    Oh ok so what I understood from that is that it is safe to use as the aquatic one is the same product just easier to anchor down. I am understanding this correctly right? Unfortunately I do not believe that product is available in my area.

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  16. keithgh

    keithgh Moderator Staff Member

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    This is your product it does not say any thing about using it for Aquatic plants or its inhabitants.
    http://www.plantersplace.com/products/osmocote_outdoor_indoor

    That is the reason I only used Seachem Stability one every three months for the rooted plants.

    Re buying the Aquatic product in your area contact the (info should be on the container)

    Keith:cat::cat:
     
  17. ShadowMac

    ShadowMac Moderator Staff Member

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    The "root feeder" myth is ever persistent isn't it. All aquatic plants can absorb nutrients through their leaves. If you want evidence of that check out all the folks growing crypts in eco complete.

    The leaf pictured at the start is emersed growth. It will die back when submerged as the plant transitions to submerged life.

    If you are dosing EI, you can, in most cases, rule out nutrient deficiencies...that is the great thing about EI.

    You need to be careful with osmocote because it can release ammonia....if you use too much you could have problems.
     
  18. hektek.hn

    hektek.hn New Member

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    You are definitely correct that plants absorb nutrients through their leaves, but the question is how much is actually being absorbed?
    A heavy root feeder like a Giant Amazon Sword, i believe would need a little more then just nutrients in the water column.
    And also using "Eco Complete" is a form of root feeding. Contains major and minor trace elements, but once those nutrients are diminished you have to replace with root tabs.



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  19. keithgh

    keithgh Moderator Staff Member

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    hektec

    Yes plants do absorb through their leafs and at the same time through their root system. The foliar foods break down in the water column far quicker that the root fert tabs.

    My question to the Substrate makers would be why do they add "Ingredients" to their products if the plants did not absorb it through their roots especially when doing the DSM.

    Keith:cat::cat:
     
  20. ShadowMac

    ShadowMac Moderator Staff Member

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    Eco complete is inert. The nutrients it claims to have are not bio available....so it is not root feeding. An analogous example. Silica sand is SiO2...it contains oxygen...but it does not supply oxygen to the system.

    I didn't say they don't feed from the roots. Plants benefit from both places and utilizing both is the best approach. What I mean is that if dosing EI to the water column it is unlikely their will be nutrient deficiencies for most setups. It is designed that way. It is a moot point, however, considering the leaf the OP was referring to was emergent growth that was dying back after being submerged.
     

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