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A crappy picture of one of my bugs!

Discussion in 'Shrimp and Invertz' started by Orlando, Apr 27, 2008.

  1. Orlando

    Orlando Supporting Member

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    Location:
    Florida
    Im still learning how to use this macro lens. Man I wish I had more time to practice. Till next time:)
     

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  2. John N.

    John N. Administrator Staff Member

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    Location:
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    Not a bad shot. Slightly overexposed I think, but great composition. A little color balancing through photoshop may do wonders for it.

    -John N.
     
  3. Pat7676

    Pat7676 New Member

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    Nice start!
     
  4. Orlando

    Orlando Supporting Member

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    Thanks guys! You experts gotta tell me what Im doing wrong. Im not hip with photo lingo. Hey there and Idea for the Aquatic plant photography, how about a sticky on the lingo...Hmmm IDK
    I will keep practicing, its just that my eye keeps cramping up. I wish I could plug a monitor into my camera so I could just look through that. Do they make something like this?
     
  5. waterfaller1

    waterfaller1 New Member

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    Orlando,FL
    How do you get an eye cramp? 8) Nice pic.
     
  6. matpat

    matpat New Member

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    I may be able to offer a little help in layman's terms but I am still struggling with my Nikon D50 and macro lens. Since you have a macro lens, I assume you are talking you pics in manual mode, if not, you should be :D

    My camera has a little meter in the viewfinder with a zero on it and dashes to the left (overexposure or too bright) and right (underexposure or too dark). By changing your shutter speed (number only) and/or aperature (f and number) the dashes to the left or right will light up telling you how close you are to the correct exposure which is zero on my camera.

    The pic does look overexposed so you can reduce the amount of light by increasing the shutter speed (the numbers without the f in front of them) or decreasing the aperature (the numbers with the f in front of them). If you took this pic at a shutter speed of, say 60, and f stop of f/5.6, try bumping the shutter speed up to 80 or 100 and see if the pic looks better. You may be able to get the same results by leaving the shutter speed at 60 and decreasing the f stop to 5. I know, it can be confusing so just play with one at a time at first :)

    One other thing, stopping down (decreasing the aperature or f stop) allows less light into the camera and also increases your depth of field making the background more in focus. Adjusting the shutter speed does nothing for the depth of field. I think for this pic, stopping down (decreasing the aperature or f stop) would have brought the tail of the shrimp into focus a bit more and reduced the light making the pic look better ;)

    Just try to have fun with the pics and take several at different shutter speeds and aperatures and see which looks the best. When I first started, I took several pics and bumped the shutter speed up or down a notch for each pic to see how it turned out. Then I did the same but changed the aperature (f and numbers) and compared all the pics to see which worked out best. You will eventually get the hang of it and I know, it can be very confusing when starting out but keep practicing.
     

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