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60cm Riparium

Discussion in 'Aquascaping Journals' started by hydrophyte, Mar 11, 2010.

  1. hydrophyte

    hydrophyte Moderator Staff Member

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    I have a start on a new display. I don't have the tank in place yet, but I think I have a clear vision in mind. This new one will go into a 60-litre rimless tank (60cm wide X 30cm tall X 30cm deep). I have not tried a riparium in such a small enclosure before, but I have a good plan in mind for plant selection and other important points.

    I had a lot of fun with my latest layout (now dismantled) and I intend to use certain elements of that setup for this new project. Here's a shot from that 200-litre riparium.

    [​IMG]

    I have that one journaled in this thread...

    New Riparium Setup in 50-gallon Tank

    Here are some features that characterize that design pretty well:

    • A tank filled with water to about 2/3 of total depth
    • Relatively bright lighting
    • Erect, tidy, "grassy" background plant (Cyperus) that throws relatively little shade
    • Fine-leaved sprawling stem plants (Bacopa, Limnophila, and others) growing on trellis rafts and forming dense floating carpet
    • Underwater scape lacking plants, but with an artistically-rendered stone layout
    • Relatively large and showy fish
    • A striking centerpiece plant (Cyrtosperma)

    My new project in the 60cm tank will use some of the same elements, with a few important variations. I hope to adapt a general Nature Aquarium design concept for this riparium planting. I list here some elements that will support this idea:

    • Emersed plants with relatively fine foliage
    • Emersed plants having mainly subdued, green foliage, as opposed to leaf variegation or bright coloration
    • A well-rendered underwater hardscape lacking plants or having just a few bright green plants
    • A group or two of small, tightly-shoaling fish
    • No conspicuous centerpiece plants or fish

    With another post or two I will explain more specific ideas for hardware, scaping, plant selection and fish stocking. I would be interested to hear any ideas that you might have.
     

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  2. Raven

    Raven New Member

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    Very attractive !! the central plant with red leaves is striking !
    How to you keep the plants humid and prevent them from burning by the lighting heat ?
     
  3. Jurijs mit JS

    Jurijs mit JS Admin Staff Member

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    sounds good,
    keep up the good work :proud:
     
  4. hydrophyte

    hydrophyte Moderator Staff Member

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    Thanks very much!

    These plants are all adapted to grow well in moderate humidity levels. This room is usually at about 50% relative humidity.
     
  5. soqboy

    soqboy New Member

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    Very attractive !!
    keep up the good work
     
  6. hydrophyte

    hydrophyte Moderator Staff Member

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    Hey thanks soqboy. I hope to come back soon with another update.
     
  7. hydrophyte

    hydrophyte Moderator Staff Member

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    I made some more headway late last night. I had all of the plants groing out the top of a 80-litre that was sitting in the same spot where the new setup will go. I moved the riparium plants to this plastic basin while doing the switch.

    [​IMG]

    I think that I'm going to use most of these same plants for the layout. This gives an idea of what they might look like together.

    Here's the tank, a standard 60-litre (60cm wide X 30cm tall X 30cm deep) with top plastic rim removed.

    [​IMG]
     
  8. hydrophyte

    hydrophyte Moderator Staff Member

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    I decided to just re-silicone the tank seams. That second shot above shows the tank also with the sealant in each of the four corner seems removed. This took a couple of hours of careful scraping with the razor. After getting it all cleaned up I masked off both sides of each corner, leaving about 7mm or so for the new seams.

    [​IMG]

    I used a plastic yogurt lid to make a triangular sealant scraper. It worked pretty slick and scraped the silicone bead down to a nice even seam.

    [​IMG]

    After letting it cure overnight I used a new razor blade to cut through the sealant right along the edge of the masking tape, then pulled the tape off. It looks pretty good.
     
  9. Jurijs mit JS

    Jurijs mit JS Admin Staff Member

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    you could have pulled the tape off right after sealing ..
    detail picture of now would be great :)
    I discovered I like DIY very much :D
     
  10. hydrophyte

    hydrophyte Moderator Staff Member

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    It came off pretty well the way that I did it. I just hope that it will hold water! These tanks are not designed to be used this way without a top rim. We still have limited availability of rimless tanks here in the US. :Blah:
     
  11. hydrophyte

    hydrophyte Moderator Staff Member

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    I painted a background on the tank. It goes to a bit higher than 2/3 up. I will fill it to even with the top of the paint, so there will be about 3 1/2" of seem above the waterline.

    [​IMG]
     
  12. hydrophyte

    hydrophyte Moderator Staff Member

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    I also filled it up for a leak test. It looks OK so far.

    [​IMG]

    I got a few plants into the tank too. The dwarf A. gramineus is really a great plant and perfect for a little setup like this one. Sometimes Acorus are a bit tricky and resist growing, but these plants are doing well and already have good root development inside of the planter cup.

    [​IMG]

    Notice that the cup is filled to more than 1/2 full with hydroton. It seems this plant does better with a coarse-grained substrate. As is true for Anubias plants, it is also important for the creeping rhizome to be on top of the substrate. You can see the little bit of green of the rhizome in this next shot.

    [​IMG]
     
  13. Jurijs mit JS

    Jurijs mit JS Admin Staff Member

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    nice details :)
    you make me willing to do something similar :D
     
  14. hydrophyte

    hydrophyte Moderator Staff Member

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    Thanks jur4ik.

    Here's the whole planting as I have it now.

    [​IMG]

    It definitely has that "just planted" look, but it should start to shape up as the plants grow in some more. I will probably move the plants around some too. The plants will also cover that foam and plastic as they grow in.
     
  15. hydrophyte

    hydrophyte Moderator Staff Member

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    Here is another view of the planting. Those planter cups are conspicuous from this angle, but that is in part because of the light reflecting up from the bare glass tank bottom. The planters will become more obscured as the plants grow in and throw more shade.

    [​IMG]

    This plant layout needs more vertical dimension. The Pogonatherum is supposed to grow up to about 30cm and look very much like bamboo as it gets bigger. I might also consider adding a more vertical stem plant of some kind.
     
  16. hydrophyte

    hydrophyte Moderator Staff Member

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    I got some gravel into this tank and snapped a quick picture too.

    [​IMG]

    I'll work on the hardscape next.
     
  17. hydrophyte

    hydrophyte Moderator Staff Member

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    I have a start on the hardscape. I decided to go with the lace rock.

    [​IMG]

    I hope to be back with pictures soon.
     
  18. Enrico Serena

    Enrico Serena New Member

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    I'm totally unexperienced with paludarium, (by the way: is paludarium the same of riparium in English?).
    This journal is very interesting for me.
    Amazing work... can't wait to see updates.
    Congratulations

    Ciao
     
  19. hydrophyte

    hydrophyte Moderator Staff Member

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    Thanks Enrico, Actually ripariums are different from paludariums. Paludariums have built-up terrestrial areas, so they are more like a terrarium with a water feature. In ripariums the planters are supported by floating and hanging planters, so there is no real land area. Ripariums generally have much more water than paludariums, so they are better for displaying fish.

    Here is one hardscape idea.

    [​IMG]

    I don't like this so much, but I can try other ideas easily enough. I don't know if I will use that lace rock in the end. You can see that I need to add some taller plants.
     
  20. Jurijs mit JS

    Jurijs mit JS Admin Staff Member

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    what about submersed planting?
     

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